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" The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs... "
Works - Page 248
by Sir William Jones - 1807
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Bibliotheca Sacra and Theological Review, Volume 24

Theology - 1867
...Indian erudition." He introduced it to the notice of the learned in the following words : " The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful...stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs, and in the forms of grammar than could possibly have been produced by accident; so strong, indeed, that no philosopher...
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The Universalist Quarterly and General Review, Volume 24; Volume 44

Universalism - 1887
...century ago, he expressed himself thus : " The Sanskrit language, whatever may be its antiquity, is of wonderful structure ; more perfect than the Greek,...stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could have been produced by accideut ; so strong that no philologer could examine...
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The North British review, Volume 1

1844
...William Jones, the pioneer and prince of British orientalists, has been amply vindicated : " The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful...refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a strong affinity." Colebrooke, whose attainments in the knowledge of the language were unequalled in...
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Bibliotheca Sacra and Theological Review, Volume 4

Theology - 1847
...subject leads every one directly to the Sanscrit Sir William Jones makes this remark : l " The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful...than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more excellently refined than either." If we must take this with much allowance, still no one can receive...
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The Calcutta Review, Volume 3

India - 1847
...threw light upon a language which he afterwards, according to his famous dictum, pronounced to be " of wonderful structure : more perfect than the Greek,...Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either." Since that time an interest in this and in other oriental tongues has spread rapidly over England,...
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Report

British Association for the Advancement of Science - Science - 1848
...William Jones, when he first became acquainted with the Sacred language of India, said, "The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful...refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a strong affinity ;" and it would be difficult to characterise this language better than in the words...
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Report of the Annual Meeting

British Association for the Advancement of Science - Science - 1848
...William Jones, when he first became acquainted with the Sacred language of India, said, "The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful...refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a strong affinity ;" and it would be difficult to characterise this language better than in the words...
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Three Linguistic Dissertations: Read at the Meeting of the British ...

Chevalier Bunsen, Charles Meyer, Friedrich Max Müller - Bengali language - 1848 - 97 pages
...William JonesNwhen he first became acquainted with the Sacred language of India, said, "The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful...refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a strong affinity;" and it would be difficult to characterise this language better than in the words...
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Mithridates Minor: Or, An Essay on Language

Henry Welsford - English language - 1848 - 431 pages
...prima facie, this agrees very badly with Sir William Jones's elaborate eulogium, " that the Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful...than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more excellently refined than either." (Wilkins's Gramm. pages 36—39.) viII. The Sanskrit Pronouns are...
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The Bible of every land, a history of the sacred Scriptures in every ...

1848
...with the two learned languages of Europe attested its superiority over both, for it is, as he said, " more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either." Its nouns, like the Greek, admit of three numbers (singular, dual, and plural), and of three genders...
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