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" The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs... "
Works - Page 248
by Sir William Jones - 1807
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Anglo-Indian Domestic Life: A Letter from an Artist in India to His Mother ...

Colesworthey Grant - Anglo-Indians - 1862 - 188 pages
...laws, their great poetical and philosophical works ; — " a language (in the words of Sir W. Jones) of wonderful structure ; more perfect than the Greek,...Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either." The Bengalee, which has character, though little or no literature, entirely its own, is but little...
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Education in India, an essay

Charles Wallwyn Radcliffe Cooke - 1864
...the language in which that literature is embodied. The Sanskrit language is styled by Sir W. Jones " a wonderful structure ; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more excellently refined than either." Numberless are the grammars, dictionaries, and treatises on rhetoric,...
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The stream of life on our globe ... as revealed by modern discoveries in ...

John Laws Milton - 1864
...the very first, to find the key to this mystery in the Sanskrit, to observe that it was a Ianguage of wonderful structure, more perfect than the greek, more copious than the latin, more exquisitely refined than either, and that it was impossible to compare the three without arriving...
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The Quarterly Review, Volume 119

1866
...was one of the founders. 'The Sanscrit language, whatever be its * 'Lectures,' 1st Series. p. 139. antiquity, is of a wonderful structure ; more perfect...stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident ; so strong indeed, that no philologer...
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The Quarterly Review, Volume 119

English literature - 1866
...the founders. 'The Sanserit language, whatever be its * ' Lectures,' lit Series, p. 139. antiquity, antiquity, is of a wonderful structure ; more perfect...stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident ; so strong indeed, that no philologer...
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Representing India: Indian Culture and Imperial Control in Eighteenth ...

Michael J. Franklin - Asia - 2000 - 576 pages
...Anniversary Discourse' to the Asiatick Society, which contains the following famous passage: The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than ihe Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both...
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The Mummies of Ürümchi

E. J. W. Barber - History - 1999 - 240 pages
...Sanskrit texts of India (newly "discovered" by European scholars) bore to Classical Greek and Latin "a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident; so strong, indeed, that no philologer...
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The Quest for the Origins of Vedic Culture: The Indo-Aryan Migration Debate

Edwin Bryant - Religion - 2003 - 387 pages
...quotation, has by now become the mangaldcdra of comparative philology: The Sanskrit language, whatever may be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more...stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident; so strong, indeed, that no philologer...
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Simplifications: An Introduction to Structuralism and Post-structuralism

Aniket Jaaware - Linguistics in literature - 2001 - 559 pages
...Bengal Asiatic Society, Calcutta, in 1786: The Sanskrit language, whatever may be its antiquity, is of wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek,...stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could have been produced by accident; so strong that no philologer could examine...
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The Sanskrit Language

Thomas Burrow - Sanskrit language - 2001 - 438 pages
...outlines the significance of the new discovery : ' The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of wonderful structure ; more perfect than the Greek,...a stronger affinity both in the roots of verbs and the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident ; so strong indeed that no...
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