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" The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs... "
Works - Page 248
by Sir William Jones - 1807
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Works, Volume 3

Sir William Jones - 1807
...prevailed in it. • The Sanfcrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful ftructure ; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquifitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a ftronger affinity, both in the roots...
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The Works of Sir William Jones: With the Life of the Author, Volume 3

John Shore Baron Teignmouth - 1807
...has prevailed in it. ^ The Sanfcrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful ftru&ure ; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquifitely^jrefined than either, yet bearing to both of them a ftronger affinity, both in the roots...
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A Grammar of the Sanskrĭta Language

Charles Wilkins - Sanskrit language - 1808 - 662 pages
...Asiatic Researches of the Society instituted by him inCalcutta, has pronounced that — " The Sanskrit language, whatever " be its antiquity, is of a wonderful..." the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more excellently " refined than either." The profound and critical knowledge of HT Colebrooke, Esq. in this...
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The Ecclesiastical and University Annual Register ...: With an Appendix ...

Universities and colleges - 1809
...following: The Sanscrit, now nearly confined to learned men, and which Sir William Jones has represented as more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either. A version into this language is now in a state of forwardness. The Hindustani, derived from the Hindi....
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The British Encyclopedia, Or Dictionary of Arts and Sciences ..., Volume 1

William Nicholson - Natural history - 1809
...perfect than tlie Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more refined i iun either, yet bearing to both a .stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs, and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident. Of their philosophy it has been...
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The Edinburgh Review, Volume 13

English literature - 1809
...compare the structure of both. But, of a language which Sir William Jones has not scrupled to call ' more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more excellently- refined than either,' it would not be easy to give an idea within the limits of a review....
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The Youth's Companion: Or An Historical Dictionary; Consisting of Articles ...

Ezra Sampson - Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1813 - 424 pages
...translated by Mr. Wilkins, and Sir William Jones. " The Sanscrit language, (says Sir William Jones) whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure...stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs, and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident ; so strong, indeed, that no philologer...
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The Youth's magazine, or Evangelical miscellany

1842
...primeval language of India, but introduced by conquerors from other kingdoms." He then describes it as "more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, but bearing to both a stronger affinity than could possibly be produced by accident." This resemblance,...
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The British Plutarch: Containing the Lives of the Most Eminent Divines ...

Francis Wrangham - Great Britain - 1816
...Discourse, in particular it may be observed, he remarks the wonderful structure of the Sanscrit, " more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the...than could possibly have been produced by accident, though their common source may perhaps no longer exist. To -the Debnagari characters he traces the...
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The Youth's Companion, Or, An Historical Dictionary: Consisting of Articles ...

Ezra Sampson - Children's encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1816 - 412 pages
...translated by Mr. Wilkins, and Sir William Jones. " The Sanscrit language, (says Sir William Jones') whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure...stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs, and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident ; so strong, indeed, that no philologer...
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