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" The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs... "
Works - Page 248
by Sir William Jones - 1807
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Genetic, Linguistic and Archaeological Perspectives on Human Diversity in ...

Li Jin, Mark Seielstad, Chunjie Xiao - History - 2001 - 188 pages
...locate the homeland of speakers of ancient languages. 3. To date splits among languages. "The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful...refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a strong affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been...
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Linguistics: An Introduction to Language and Communication

Adrian Akmajian, Richard A. Demer, Ann K. Farmer, Robert M. Harnish - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2001 - 604 pages
...the classical and other ancient languages was Sir William Jones, who wrote in 1786 that The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful...perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin ... yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of...
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Linguistic Archaeology: An Introduction

Edo Nyland - Foreign Language Study - 2001 - 541 pages
...languages, such as Sanskrit, Greek, Latin, Gothic, Celtic and Persian must come from the same source: "a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident; so strong, indeed, that nophilologer...
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The Linguistics Encyclopedia

Kirsten Malmkjær, Professor Kirsten Malmkjaer - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2002 - 643 pages
...the same origin, which perhaps no longer existed. In his words (in Lehmann 1967: 15): The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful...stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident; so strong indeed, that no philologer...
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Serial Verbs in Oceanic: A Descriptive Typology

Terry Crowley - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2002 - 281 pages
...Indo-European tthough without that name) and the related idea of language families back in l786: The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful...stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident: so strong indeed, that no philologer...
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Comparative Arawakan Histories: Rethinking Language Family and Culture Area ...

Jonathan D. Hill, Fernando Santos-Granero - Foreign Language Study - 2002 - 340 pages
...English. The often-quoted observation states that "The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity is of wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek,...stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident; so strong indeed, that no philologer...
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Shelley Among Others: The Play of the Intertext and the Idea of Language

Stuart Peterfreund - Literary Criticism - 2002 - 406 pages
...1:344). From Jones's "Third Anniversary Discourse" (1786), Shelley would have known that "The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful...either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity . . . than could possibly have been produced by accident." And Shelley would also have known that Sanskrit...
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History in English Words

Owen Barfield - Language Arts & Disciplines - 1967 - 240 pages
...the European and Sanskrit languages. In 1786 Sir William Jones described that language as being 'of wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek,...than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than i9 either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms...
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Hindu-Christian Dialogue: Theological Soundings and Perspectives

Mariasusai Dhavamony - Religion - 2002 - 220 pages
...Hungarian and Finnish belong to the Finno-Ugrian family. The Sanskrit language, whatever be its amiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latm, and more exquisitely refmed than either; yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both...
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The Handbook of Linguistics

Mark Aronoff, Janie Rees-Miller - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2003 - 840 pages
...repeated passage in linguistic history is Sir William Jones' (17461794) statement in 1786: The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful...stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident; so strong indeed, that no philologer...
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