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" The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs... "
Works - Page 248
by Sir William Jones - 1807
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Discourses delivered before the Asiatic society: and miscellaneous papers on ...

Sir William Jones - 1824
...of Brahma has prevailed in it. The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wondei fill structure ; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refmed than either ; yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs, and...
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Elements of the Philosophy of the Human Mind, Volume 3

Dugald Stewart - Psychology - 1827
...718. t Edinburgh Review, Vol. XIII. p. 369. " Whatever be its antiquity, (says Sir William Jones) it is " of a wonderful structure, more perfect than the...affinity, both " in the roots of verbs, and in the forms of grammar, than " could possibly have been produced by accident ; so strong, " indeed, that...
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The Quarterly Oriental Magazine, Review, and Register, Part 76, Volume 7

British - 1827
...written respecting Sanscrit. Because until the opinion of Sir William JONES — " that the Sanscrit Language,, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful...than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more refined than either,"* be disproved ; and it be satisfactorily shewn that the date of the earliest...
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Researches Into the Origin and Affinity of the Principal Languages of Asia ...

Vans Kennedy - Asia - 1828 - 324 pages
...insurmountable objection: for Sir W. Jones has with the greatest justice observed that " the Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful...stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident ; so strong, indeed, that no philologer...
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The Southern Review, Volume 3

1829
...their existence, but no more! The Sanscrit language (says Sir Wm. Jones, third discourse on the Hindus) whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure,...stronger affinity both in the roots of verbs, and in the forms of grammar than could possibly have been produced by accident ; so strong, indeed, that no philologer...
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The Southern Review, Volume 3

1829
...their existence, but no more! The Sanscrit language (says Sir Wm. Jones, third discourse on the Hindus) whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure,...exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them n stronger affinity both in the roots of verbs, and in the forms of grammar than could possibly have...
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The Works of Dugald Stewart: Elements of the philosophy of the human mind ...

Dugald Stewart - 1829
...assertion. — See his Geography, \ ol. I. p. 718. t Edinburgh Review, Vol. XIII. p. 369. VOL. III. 12 Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely...stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs, and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident ; so strong, indeed, that no philosopher...
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An Historical Sketch of Sanscrit Literature,: With Copious ..., Part 167

Friedrich von Adelung - Sanskrit language - 1832 - 234 pages
... i 2 V AN HISTORICAL SKETCH OF SANSCRIT LITERATURE. THE SANSCRIT LANGUAGE, WHATEVER BE ITS ANTIQUITY, IS OF A WONDERFUL...THAN THE GREEK, MORE COPIOUS THAN THE LATIN, AND MORE EXCELLENTLY REFINED THAN EITHER. SIR WILLIAM JONES. HISTORICAL SKETCH OF SANSCRIT LITERATURE, WITH...
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The Mythology of the Hindus: With Notices of the Various Mountain and Island ...

Charles Coleman - Ethnology - 1832 - 401 pages
...merely, but our souls and) our intellects." Their ancient language, the Sanscrit, is described as being more perfect than the Greek, — more copious than...Latin, — and more exquisitely refined than either. It has been urged against them, by some most respectable authors, that their deities are nothing but...
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New Monthly Magazine, Volume 36

Thomas Campbell, Samuel Carter Hall, Edward Bulwer Lytton Baron Lytton, Theodore Edward Hook, Thomas Hood, William Harrison Ainsworth - 1832
...whom it is held in sacred veneration. Of the tongue Itself, Sir William Jones observes, " The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure ; more perfect than the Greek, mure copious than the Latin, and more excellently refined than either." if. Von Humboldt speaks of...
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