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" Darkling I listen; and, for many a time I have been half in love with easeful Death, Call'd him soft names in many a mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While... "
Chambers's Pocket Miscellany - Page 74
1854
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The Poetical Works of Howitt, Milman, and Keats: Complete in One Volume

Mary Botham Howitt - English poetry - 1853 - 522 pages
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath ; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring...such an ecstasy ! Still wouldst thou sing, and I have care in vain— To thy high requiem become a sod. 7. Thou wast not born for death, immortal Bird !...
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Poets of England and America: Being Selections from the Best Authors of Both ...

Poets, American - 1853 - 472 pages
...mused rhyme To take into the air my quiet hreath ; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstacy ! Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vainTo thy high requiem become a sod. Thou wast...
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The Rhyme and Reason of Country Life, Or, Selections from Fields Old and New

Susan Fenimore Cooper - Country life - 1854 - 428 pages
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath; Now, more than ever, seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight, with no pain, While thou art pouring...born for death, immortal bird ! No hungry generations trend thee down ; The voice I hear this passing night was heard In ancient days by emperor and clown...
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Pictorial Calendar of the Seasons, ...

Mary Botham Howitt - Country life - 1854 - 567 pages
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath ; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring...high requiem become a sod. Thou wast not born for earth, immortal bird ! No hungry generations tread thee down ; The voice I hear this passing night...
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Pictorial Calendar of the Seasons, ...

Mary Botham Howitt - Country life - 1854 - 567 pages
...breath ; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While th mi art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstasy...high requiem become a sod. Thou wast not born for earth, immortal bird ! No hungry generations tread thee down ; The voice I hear this passing night...
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Proceedings of the Literary & Philosophical Society of Liverpool, Issue 22

Literary and Philosophical Society of Liverpool - 1868
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath ; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring...ecstasy ! Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears La vain To thy high requiem, become a sod." From that new masterpiece of Tennyson's genius " Lucretius,"...
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Beauties of the British Poets, with a Few Introd. Observations

George Croly (Rev., ed) - 1854
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath ; Now more thnn ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such au ecstasy ! Still would'st thou sing, and I have ears in vain—- To thy high requiem become a sod....
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Recollections of a Literary Life

Mary Russell Mitford - Authors - 1855 - 558 pages
...musfed rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath ; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstasy I Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears is vain, — To thy high requiem become a sod. Thou wast...
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The Rhyme and Reason of Country Life, Or, Selections from Fields Old and New

Susan Fenimore Cooper - Country life - 1855 - 428 pages
...rhyme, To take into the air- my quiet breath ; Now, more than ever, seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight, with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad, In such an eestasy ! Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain — To thy high requiem become a sod. Thou...
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The Poetical Works of John Keats

John Keats - 1855 - 350 pages
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath ; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an eestasy ! Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain — To thy high requiem become a sod. Thou...
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