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" Darkling I listen; and, for many a time I have been half in love with easeful Death, Call'd him soft names in many a mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While... "
Chambers's Pocket Miscellany - Page 74
1854
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Imagination and Fancy: Or, Selections from the English Poets, Illustrative ...

Leigh Hunt - English poetry - 1845 - 255 pages
...mused rhyme To take into the air my quiet breath ; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstacy ! Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain— To thy high requiem become a sod. Thou...
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Sharpe's London magazine, a journal of entertainment and ..., Volumes 2-3

Anna Maria Hall
...numberless Singest of summer in full-throated eaw. . . Now, more than ever, it scems rieli to dic, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an eatacy I Still would'st thou sing, and I have ears in vain — ' To thy hu'lt requicm become a sod....
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The Poets and Poetry of England: In the Nineteenth Century

Rufus Wilmot Griswold - Authors, English - 1845 - 504 pages
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath. Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an eestasy ! Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain, To thy high requiem become a sod. Thou...
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Imagination and Fancy: Or, Selections from the English Poets, Illustrative ...

Leigh Hunt - English poetry - 1845 - 255 pages
...mused rhyme To take into the air my quiet breath ; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstacy ! Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain— To thy high requiem become a sod. Thou...
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Imagination and fancy; or Selections from the English poets, with critical ...

Leigh Hunt - 1845
...mused rhyme To take into the air my quiet breath; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul ahroad In such an ecstacy ! Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain— To thy high requiem...
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The Book of Gems: Wordsworth to Bayley

Samuel Carter Hall - English poetry - 1846
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath : Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring...No hungry generations tread thee down ; The voice I heard this passing night was heard In ancient days by emperor and clown : Perhaps the self-same song...
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The Poetical Works of John Keats: In Two Parts

John Keats - English poetry - 1846
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath ; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring...In such an ecstasy ! Still wouldst thou sing, and l have ears in vain — To thy high requiem become a sod. MISCELLANEOUS POEMS. IC5 VII. Thou wast not...
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The Poetical Works of John Keats. In Two Parts, Parts 1-2

John Keats - 1846
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath ; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring...abroad In such an ecstasy ! Still wouldst thou sing, and.l have ears in vain — To thy high requiem become a sod. " . vn. Thou wast not born for death,...
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The Poets and Poetry of England: In the Nineteenth Century

Rufus Wilmot Griswold - Authors, English - 1846 - 504 pages
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath. Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an eestasy ! Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain, To thy high requiem become a sod. Thou...
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The Poetical Works of John Keats, Page 1

John Keats - 1847 - 256 pages
...many a time To take into the air my quiet breath; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring...ears in vain— To thy high requiem become a sod. 7Thou wast not born for death, immortal Bird! No hungry generations tread thee down ; The voice I hear...
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