Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" Darkling I listen; and, for many a time I have been half in love with easeful Death, Call'd him soft names in many a mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While... "
Chambers's Pocket Miscellany - Page 74
1854
Full view - About this book

The Imperial Theme

G. Wilson Knight - Literary Collections - 2002 - 392 pages
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring...ears in vain — To thy high requiem become a sod. "There death is blended not with love, but bird-music. 'Birds' and 'music' are both close to 'love'...
Limited preview - About this book

A World of Local Voices: Poetry in English Today

Klaus Martens, Paul Duncan Morris, Arlette Warken - American poetry - 2003 - 160 pages
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring...have ears in vain To thy high requiem become a sod. (208) But while in the thrall of the nightingale's song, the speaker implies he is somehow transformed...
Limited preview - About this book

A Routledge Literary Sourcebook on the Poems of John Keats

John R. Strachan - Literary Criticism - 2003 - 198 pages
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring...have ears in vain — To thy high requiem become a sod.41 60 31 Invisible. 32 By chance. 33 Fairies. 34 Flourishing. 35 'Darkness or obscurity, the result...
Limited preview - About this book

An Integral View Of Poetry: An India Perspective

Vinayak Krishna Gokak - 1975 - 224 pages
...know on earth and all ye need to know." When he hears the nightingale singing, Keats exclaims : "Thou wast not born for death, immortal bird ! No hungry...hear this passing night was heard In ancient days by'emperor and clown." The whole of that stanza, which culminates in the opening of magic casements...
Limited preview - About this book

A Week in Winter: A Novel

Marcia Willett - Fiction - 2002 - 352 pages
...standing behind him, shivering, clasping her ruana tightly about her; heard her voice in the wind. 'Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain...— To thy high requiem become a sod. Thou wast not bom for death, immortal Bird!' 'No,' he said desperately, with a kind of revulsion. 'No. I can't put...
Limited preview - About this book

Trees: Woodlands and Western Civilization

Richard Hayman - History - 2003 - 261 pages
...poetical state as 'half in love with easeful death': Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstasy! " Keats sought in trees and birds symbols that could help communicate his personal ideas and feelings....
Limited preview - About this book

A Week in Winter: A Novel

Marcia Willett - Fiction - 2002 - 352 pages
...to thee ... on the viewless wings of Poesy . . . Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstasy! . . . Thou wast not bom for death, immortal Bird! . . .' Odd that the girl's bright, young, eager face...
Limited preview - About this book

A Companion to the Works of Heinrich Von Kleist

Bernd Fischer - Literary Criticism - 2003 - 258 pages
...the Theme of Death in Kleist's Works Hilda M. Brown Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstasy! (Keats, "Ode to a Nightingale") RIPENESS AND DEATH are brought into a striking new relationship in...
Limited preview - About this book

The Kabbalah of the Soul: The Transformative Psychology and Practices of ...

Leonora Leet - Body, Mind & Spirit - 2003 - 384 pages
...with easeful Death, Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain — To thy high requiem become a sod. (51-60) The suffering artist is a cultural stereotype because so many artists, especially when young,...
Limited preview - About this book

Close Reading: The Reader

Frank Lentricchia, Andrew DuBois - Literary Criticism - 2003 - 391 pages
...Byzantium, but an attribute of death's nothingness: "Now more than ever seems it rich to die . . . / Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain—/ To thy high requiem become a sod." Further, the immortality conferred, by contrast, upon the bird is in effect withdrawn when the poet,...
Limited preview - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF