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" Darkling I listen; and, for many a time I have been half in love with easeful Death, Call'd him soft names in many a mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While... "
Chambers's Pocket Miscellany - Page 74
1854
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Formationer i europæisk romantik

Marie-Louise Svane - European literature - 2003 - 286 pages
...full-throated ease/ (v.6-io) [...] In such an ecstacy!« (v.jS), og et rekviem for den dodsfantaserende digter: »Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain -/ To thy high requiem become a sod« (v. 59-60). Kompositionen er strammere end i de forrige digte, det har en intonationskurve med stigende...
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Desperate Remedies

Thomas Hardy - Fiction - 2003 - 415 pages
...(1818) to indicate that poverty drove Springrove to ignore his love for Cytherea for a time: 'Thou wast not born for death, immortal Bird! | No hungry generations tread thee down.' The poem is found in The Golden Treasury. 176 a concussion: a blow. Such a Cushi . . . king: Cushi is sent...
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The Boathouse

Caroline Upcher - Fiction - 2003 - 296 pages
...listened. When I couldn't see him I was ready to fall in love with him. He was reading Keats. Thou wast not born for death, immortal Bird! No hungry generations tread thee down. The fact that he was reading from "Ode to a Nightingale" rather than "Ode to a Canary" was neither here...
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Bringing God Home: A Spiritual Guidebook for the Journey of Your Life

Forrest Church - Religion - 2003 - 256 pages
...perfect voice of a nightingale. Nou' more than ever seems it nch to die, To cease upon the midnight inth no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstasy! Having prepared the way so eloquently, when Keats died at the age of twenty-five he became a symbol...
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A Week in Winter: A Novel

Marcia Willett - Fiction - 2002 - 352 pages
...standing behind him, shivering, clasping her ruana tightly about her; heard her voice in the wind. 'Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain — To thy nigh requiem become a sod. Thou wast not born for death, immortal Bird!' 'No,' he said desperately,...
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Bartlett's Poems for Occasions

Geoffrey O'Brien, Billy Collins - Poetry - 2007 - 544 pages
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring...immortal Bird! No hungry generations tread thee down; THE HUMAN The voice I hear this passing night was heard CONDITION In ancient days by emperor and clown:...
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On Our Way: The Final Passage through Life and Death

Robert Kastenbaum - Religion - 2004 - 460 pages
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath; Now more than ever seems it rich to die To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstasy! Nevertheless, Keats, as he said, was only half in love with easeful Death. Life all too soon becomes...
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The Politics of Mourning: Grief Management in Cross-cultural Fiction

Rochelle Almeida - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 239 pages
...of trauma and bondage to the next world. He wrote: Now more than ever seems it rich to die To ease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstacy! ("Ode to a Nightingale," lines 55-58) Earlier, in the same ode, Keats had admitted: ... for...
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The Universal Kabbalah

Leonora Leet - Body, Mind & Spirit - 2004 - 494 pages
...Keats, when transported by the nightingale's song: "Now more than ever seems it rich to die /. . . . Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain — / To thy high requiem become a sod" (1l. 55, 59-60). The suffering artist is a cultural stereotype because so many artists, especially...
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When Your Way Gets Dark: A Rhetoric of the Blues

Jeffrey Carroll - Music - 2005 - 176 pages
...mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstasy! (51-58) Calt goes after an "Orientalism" that has infected much discussion of the blues since Charters,...
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