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" And thus still doing, thus he pass'd along. Duch. Alas ! poor Richard ! where rides he the while ? York. As in a theatre, the eyes of men, After a well-graced actor leaves the stage, Are idly bent on him that enters next, Thinking his prattle to be tedious... "
Elements of Criticism - Page 10
by Lord Henry Home Kames - 1762
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The wandering patentee: or, A history of the Yorkshire theatres ..., Volumes 1-2

Tate Wilkinson, Samuel Foote - Biography & Autobiography - 1795
...difefteern becaufe fhe was not fortunate — and came back again, where flic expected fond reception. " As, in a theatre, the eyes of men, " After a well-grac'd...be tedious : " Even fo, or with much more contempt, men's eyet " Did fcowl on Richard. No man cry'd, God fave him-! " No joyful tongue gave him his welcome...
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Elegant Extracts: Or, Useful and Entertaining Pieces of Poetry, Selected for ...

Vicesimus Knox - English poetry - 1796 - 1008 pages
...th while ? Y<fi. As in a. theatre the eyes of men, After a well-giac'd aélor leaves the ihigc, Arc idly bent on him that enters next, Thinking his prattle...be tedious : Even fo, or with much more contempt, men's eye? Did fcowl on Richard; no man cricd,Godfave him No joyful tongue gave him his welcome home...
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The plays of William Shakspeare, accurately pr. from the text of mr ...

William Shakespeare - 1797
...And thus ftill doing, thus he pafs'd along. Duck. Alas, poor Richard ! where rides he the wliile ? York. As in a theatre, the eyes of men, After a well-grac'd...that enters next, Thinking his prattle to be tedious ; Evenfo, or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did * Our author probably was thinking of the painted...
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Works, Containing His Plays and Poems: To which is Added a Glossary, Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1797
...Richard ! where rides he the while ? TORK. As in a theatre, the eyes of men, After a well-grac'd actor leaves the ftage, Are idly bent on him that enters...be tedious : Even fo, or with much more contempt, men's eyesDid fcowl on Richard ; no man cried, God fave him ; No joyful tongue gave him his welcome...
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Elements of Elocution: In which the Principles of Reading and Speaking are ...

John Walker - Elocution - 1799 - 398 pages
...down, and the features contracted or drawn together. See p. 329, 330. Pity in plaintive narration* As in a theatre the eyes of men, After a well-grac'd...to be tedious, Even fo, or with much more contempt, men's eyes, Did fcowl on Richard ; no man cry'd God fave him ; No joyful tongue gave him his welcome...
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The Plays of William Shakspeare. ....

William Shakespeare - 1800
...Richard ! where rides he the while f York. As in a theatre, the eyes of men, After a well-grac'd actor leaves the ftage, Are idly bent on him that enters...be tedious : Even fo, or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did fcowl on Richard ; no man cried, God fave him j No joyful tongue gave him his welcome...
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The Critical and Miscellaneous Prose Works of John Dryden, Now First ...

John Dryden - 1800
...pity, if you can: " At in a theatre, the eyes of men, " After » well-graced actor leaves the stage, " Are idly bent on him that enters next, " Thinking his prattle to be tedious,— i " Even 10, or with much more contempt, men'* eyei " Did scowl on Richard: no nun cry'd—God save...
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An American Selection of Lessons in Reading and Speaking ...: To which are ...

Noah Webster - Readers - 1802 - 262 pages
...which you never knew. [F. Penitent. Pity. As, in a theatre, the eyes of men, After a well grac'd after leaves the ftage, Are idly bent on him that enters...to be tedious; Even fo, or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did fcowl on Richard. No man cry'd God fave him ! No joyful tongue gave him his welcome...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare, Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1803
...rides he the while? York. As in a theatre, the eyes of men, After a well-grac'd actor leaves the stage, Are idly bent on him that enters next, Thinking his prattle to be tedious: Even so, or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on Richard; no man cried, God save him; No joyful...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ..., Volume 5

William Shakespeare - 1803
...York. As in. a theatre, the eyes of men, After a well-grac'd actor leaves the stage, Are idly bent s on him that enters next, Thinking his prattle to be tedious : Even so, or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on Richard ; no man cried, God save him ; No joyful...
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