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" And thus still doing, thus he pass'd along. Duch. Alas ! poor Richard ! where rides he the while ? York. As in a theatre, the eyes of men, After a well-graced actor leaves the stage, Are idly bent on him that enters next, Thinking his prattle to be tedious... "
Elements of Criticism - Page 10
by Lord Henry Home Kames - 1762
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The Plays and Poems of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ...

William Shakespeare - 1833 - 1064 pages
...he the while? York. As in a theatre 8) the eyes of men, After a well-grac'd actor leaves the stage, MACBETH. Lady JO. He has almost supp'd; Why have you left the chamber? Mm lj. H so, or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on Richard; no man cried, God save him; No joyful...
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King John. Richard the Second. Henry the Fourth. Pts. 1 and 2. Merry wives ...

1833
...thus he pass'd along. As, in a theatre, the eyes of men, After a well-graced actor leaves the stage, Are idly bent on him that enters next, Thinking his prattle to be tedious ; Even so, or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on Richard ; no man cried, God save him : But...
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A Course of Lectures on Dramatic Art and Literature

August Wilhelm von Schlegel - Drama - 1833 - 442 pages
...deserving of attention:— As in a theatre the eyes of men, After a well-graced actor leaves the stage, Are idly bent on him that enters next, Thinking his prattle to be tedious, Sec. for that we may easily suppose, but even in those external circumstances which may be the most...
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The Object of Literary Criticism

Richard Shusterman - Criticism - 1984 - 237 pages
...pity, if you can — As in a theatre, the eyes of men, After a well-graced actor leaves the stage, Are idly bent on him that enters next, Thinking his prattle to be tedious: Even so, or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on Richard; no man cried, God save him No joyful...
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The Works of John Dryden, Volume XIII: Plays: All for Love, Oedipus, Troilus ...

John Dryden - Literary Criticism - 1985 - 672 pages
...from pitty if you can. As in a Theatre, the eyes of men After a well-grac'd Actor leaves the Stage, 20 Are idly bent on him that enters next, Thinking his prattle to be tedious: Even so, or with much more contempt, mens eyes Did scowl on Richard: no man cry'd God save him: No joyful...
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Stages of History: Shakespeare's English Chronicles

Phyllis Rackin, Professor Department of English Phyllis Rackin - Drama - 1990 - 256 pages
...theatrical mediation: As in a theatre the eyes of men, After a well-graced actor leaves the stage, Are idly bent on him that enters next, Thinking his prattle to be tedious, Even so, or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on gentle Richard. No man cried "God save him!"...
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Theater Enough: American Culture and the Metaphor of the World Stage, 1607-1789

Jeffrey H. Richards, Professor of Theatre Jeffrey H Richards - Performing Arts - 1991 - 335 pages
...Bolingbroke into London: As in a theatre, the eyes of men, After a well-grac'd actor leaves the stage, Are idly bent on him that enters next, Thinking his prattle to be tedious; Even so, or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on gentle Richard. (5.2.23-28) Left to himself...
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The Columbia Granger's Dictionary of Poetry Quotations

Edith P. Hazen - Literary Criticism - 1992 - 1132 pages
...your face. (IV, i) 92 As in a theater the eyes of men. After a well-graced actor leaves the stage, (V, ii) 93 How sour sweet music is, When time is broke and no proportion kept! So is it in the music...
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Shakespeare the Actor and the Purposes of Playing

Meredith Anne Skura - Drama - 1993 - 325 pages
...and charismatic actors: As in a theater the eyes of men, After a well-grac'd actor leaves the stage, Are idly bent on him that enters next, Thinking his prattle to be tedious; Even so, or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on Richard. (R2 5.2.23-28)* As the play unfolds...
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Four Histories

William Shakespeare - Literary Criticism - 1994 - 865 pages
...rode he the whilst? YORK As in a theatre the eyes of men, After a well graced actor leaves the stage, Are idly bent on him that enters next, Thinking his prattle to be tedious: Even so, or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on gentle Richard. No man cried 'God save him!'...
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