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Books Books 81 - 90 of 182 on HAD rather believe all the fables in the Legend, and the Talmud, and the Alcoran,....
" HAD rather believe all the fables in the Legend, and the Talmud, and the Alcoran, than that this universal frame is without a mind. And therefore God never wrought miracles to convince atheism, because his ordinary works convince it. It is true, that... "
Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay: With Indexes. Authors, 544 ... - Page 47
by Samuel Austin Allibone - 1880 - 752 pages
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The divinity students manual

Lowry M'Clintock - 1853
...had rather believe all the fables in the legend, and the Talmud, and the Alcoran," (says Bacon), " than that this universal frame is without a mind,...atheism, because His ordinary works convince it." Belief in the existence of God is a truth universally received by all men, in all nations, and ages...
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A DIGEST OF THE LAWS, CUSTOM, MANNERS, AND INSTITUTIONS OF THE ANCIENT AND ...

THOMAS DEW - 1853
...and protect revolting absurdity ; and in view, no doubt, of this fact, Lord Bacon exclaimed that he " had rather believe all the fables in the Legend, and...Alcoran, than that this universal frame is without a rnind ;" (p. 60.) that is, that there is nothing, however absurd, springing out of religion, to which...
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Select specimens of English prose [ed.] by E. Hughes

Edward Hughes - 1853
...foundation in the nature of man. When the greatest of modern philosophers declares that " he would rather believe all the fables in the Legend, and the...Alcoran, than that this universal frame is without mind," he has expressed the same feeling which, in all ages and nations, has led good men, unaccustomed...
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The History of English Literature: With an Outline of the Origin and Growth ...

William Spalding - English literature - 1854 - 414 pages
...Essays : or Counsels Civil and Moral ; " ftrat published in 1597 ; revised and augmented till 1625. I had rather believe all the fables in the Legend,...is without a Mind. And therefore God never wrought miracle to convince Atheism ; because his ordinary works convince it. It is true that a little philosophy...
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The Works of Lord Bacon: Philosophical works

Francis Bacon - 1854
...with the other great men in the state; or else the remedy is worse than the disease. XVI. OF ATHEISM. ths ; mares eleven months ; bitches nine weeks ; elephants...years ; for the received tradition of ten years is miracle to convince atheism, because his ordinary works convince it. ft is true, that a little philosophy...
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The popular educator, Volume 4

1854
...He has one beautiful passage in opposition to the atheistic theory, which we cannot withhold : — " I had rather believe all the fables in the Legend,...than that this universal frame is without a mind. While the mind of man looketh at second causes scattered, it may sometimes rest in them, and go no...
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The Collected Works of Dugald Stewart: Elements of the philosophy of the ...

Dugald Stewart, John Veitch - 1854
...the voluminous and now neglected erudition displayed by Cudworth in defence of the same argument. " I had rather believe all the fables in the Legend,...Alcoran, than that this universal frame is without a mind ! It is true that a little philosophy inclineth man's mind to atheism ; but depth in philosophy hringeth...
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The Irish Church journal, and literary and theological review. [Continued as ...

United Church journal
...every one that sincerely wishes to be on the side of truth. ESSAY XVI. ATHEISM. Bacon's expression, " I had rather believe all the fables in the legend,...Alcoran, than that this universal frame is without a mind ;" shows that he had seized the just view respecting credulity ; seeing plainly that " to disbelieve...
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INFIDELITY; ITS, ASPECTS, CAUSES, AND AGENCIES

REV. THOMAS PEARSON - 1854
...is as applicable to the denial of Divine Providence as to the denial of the Divine Existence — " I had rather believe all the fables in the Legend,...Alcoran, than that this universal frame is without a mind."1 A work producing considerable excitement, calling forth a storm of opposition -from the man...
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The Philosophical Works of John Locke, Volume 1

John Locke - Philosophy - 1854
...intoxicate the brain, But drinking largely sobers us again." So Lord Bacon, in his Essay on Atheism: "A little philosophy inclineth man's mind to Atheism...minds about to religion ; for while the mind of man looketh upon second causes scattered, it may sometimes rest in them, and go no further ; but when it...
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