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Books Books 61 - 70 of 178 on HAD rather believe all the fables in the Legend, and the Talmud, and the Alcoran,....
" HAD rather believe all the fables in the Legend, and the Talmud, and the Alcoran, than that this universal frame is without a mind. And therefore God never wrought miracles to convince atheism, because his ordinary works convince it. It is true, that... "
Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay: With Indexes. Authors, 544 ... - Page 47
by Samuel Austin Allibone - 1880 - 752 pages
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Bacon: His Writings, and His Philosophy, Volume 1

1846
...nearly the whole of the Sixteenth Essay, entitled ' Of Atheism,' which is in the collection of 1612. I had rather believe all the fables in the Legend,...is without a mind. And therefore God never wrought miracle to convince atheism, because his ordinary works convince it. It is true that a little philosophy...
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The North British Review, Volume 7

1847
...Koran, than that this universal frame is without a mind ; and therefore God never wrought a miracle to convince Atheism, because his ordinary works convince...minds about to religion : for while the mind of man looketh upon second causes scattered, it may sometimes rest in them and go no farther ; but when it...
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The Modern Unbeliever

Emma Newton - 1847 - 214 pages
...spoke ; and what do you think she said? — "Wallace, I would rather," as Lord Bacon says, "I would rather believe all the fables in the legend and the...than that this universal frame is without a mind!" The Unbeliever smiled, and he answered, "Are we not agreed, my dearest Agnes ? What is that all-sustaining...
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The Bible class magazine [ed. by C.H. Bateman]., Volumes 11-12

National Sunday school union - 1871
...constrained to exclaim with the Psalmist, " 0 Lord, how'wonderful are thy works !" Lord Bacon says, " A little philosophy inclineth man's mind to atheism,...minds about to religion : for while the mind of man looketh upon second causes scattered, it may sometimes rest in them, and go no further ; but when it...
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The Wesleyan methodist association magazine, Volume 11

1848
...that his own atheism is the very essence of superstition. " I had rather," said a great philosopher, " believe all the fables in the Legend, and the Talmud,...than that this universal frame is without a mind." But the atheist takes the reverse view of the case, and falls into the extreme of superstitious credulity....
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A Treatise on the Conduct of the Understanding

John Locke - Intellect - 1849 - 132 pages
...correspondence with the other great men in the state, or else the remedy is worse than the disease. OF ATHEISM. I HAD rather believe all the fables in the legend,...is true, that a little philosophy inclineth man's miud to atheism, but depth in philosophy bringeth men's minds about to religion ; for, while the mind...
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Works, Volume 1

Francis Bacon - 1850
...with the other great men in the state; or else the remedy is worse than the disease. XVI. OF ATHEISM. I had rather believe all the fables in the Legend,...is without a mind. And therefore God never wrought miracle to convince atheism, because his ordinary works convince it. It is true, that a little philosophy...
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The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England, Volume 1

Francis Bacon - 1850
...Alcoran, than that thjs universal frame is without a mind; and, therefore, God never wrought miracle 8 - S P)_*_&S brirtgeth men's minds about to religion ;* for while the mind of man looketh upon second causes scattered,...
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The Monthly Religious Magazine, Volume 6; Volume 8

Frederic Dan Huntington - Unitarianism - 1851
...little learning is a dangerous thing," not full and deep learning. Bacon, in his Essay on Atheism, says: "It is true that a little philosophy inclineth man's...minds about to religion ; for, while the mind of man looketh upon second causes scattered, it may sometimes rest in them, and go no farther ; but, when...
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A volume of divinity for young students

Lowry M'Clintock - 1851
...had rather believe all the fables in the legend, and the Talmud, and the Alcoran," (says Bacon), " than that this universal frame is without a mind,...atheism, because His ordinary works convince it." Belief in the existence of God is a truth universally received by all men, in all nations, and ages...
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