Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" We look before and after, And pine for what is not: Our sincerest laughter With some pain is fraught; Our sweetest songs are those that tell of saddest thought. "
Beauties of the Country: Or, Descriptions of Rural Customs, Objects, Scenery ... - Page 263
by Thomas Miller - 1837 - 425 pages
Full view - About this book

Dorothy: A Tale

Margaret Agnes Paull - 1856 - 315 pages
...then she was left alone, and might relieve her full heart by tears. CHAPTER VI. We look before and after, And pine for what is not, Our sincerest laughter With some pain is fraught : Our sweetest songa are those that tell of saddest thought. SHELLEY. ' TT7ELL, Dora,' said the Colonel, as his daughter...
Full view - About this book

Principles of Elocution

Thomas Ewing - Elocution - 1857 - 412 pages
...cannot be ; Shadow of annoyance Never came near thee. Thou lovest, but ne'er knew love's sad satiety. Waking or asleep, Thou of death must deem Things more...how could thy notes flow in such a crystal stream? Better than all measures Of delight and sound, Better than all treasures That in books are found, Thy...
Full view - About this book

A woman's story, Volume 1; Volume 556

Anna Maria Hall - 1857
...shall do this often, I trust, without wearying those who read. 31 CHAPTER II. " We look before and after, And pine for what is not ; Our sincerest laughter...some pain is fraught ; Our sweetest songs are those which tell of saddest thought 1 " SHELLEY. THE allotted month of Mrs. Lyndsey's seclusion was a period...
Full view - About this book

The Living Age ..., Volume 55

1857
...stirrings of memory and melancholy which the early season causes in* most of us. " We look before and after, And pine for what is not; Our sincerest laughter With some pain is fraught; Our i.irr,/f:,i tongs are those that tell of laddesl thought. Most people who have any sympathy with sounds...
Full view - About this book

The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 108

American literature - 1911
...of the morrow, no fearful peering into the future, no foreboding of final death. We look before and after. And pine for what is not: Our sincerest laughter With some pain is fraught — while they (to make free with another's phrases) living i* the sun, seeking the food they eat,...
Full view - About this book

Lily Bell: Or, The Lost Child

Alice Fay - 1857 - 343 pages
...as it may seem, they ate their suppers like other sensible people. CHAPTER XXXIX. We look before and after, And pine for what is not; Our sincerest laughter, With some pain is fraught. SHELLY. Thine is a grief that wastes the heart, Like mildew on a tulip's dies — When hope deferr'd...
Full view - About this book

Dorothy: A Tale

Margaret Agnes Paull - English fiction - 1857 - 314 pages
...full heart by tears. CHAPTER VI. We look before and after, And pine for what is not. Our sinccrest laughter With some pain is fraught: Our sweetest songs are those that tell of saddest thought. SHELLET. ""WELL, Dora," said the Colonel, as his daughter entered his room at an...
Full view - About this book

The Rambler, a Catholic journal of home and foreign literature [&c ..., Volume 9

1858
...stanzas in the whole poem are the one or two without therjij as for instance : " We look before and after, And pine for what is not : Our sincerest laughter...is fraught ; Our sweetest songs are those that tell of saddest thought." The same may be said of Tennyson. Compare him with himself in such poems as "...
Full view - About this book

The Worship of God and Fellowship Among Men: A Series of Sermons on Public ...

Frederick Denison Maurice - Public worship - 1858 - 150 pages
...after so many ages the curse of the world, the proof of its emptiness. Still — "We look before and after, And pine for what is not; Our sincerest laughter...some pain is fraught; Our sweetest songs are those which tell of saddest thought." Do we ever see any one who appears to have found rest and satisfaction...
Full view - About this book

The poetical reader, with notes and questions by A.W. Buchan

Alexander Winton Buchan - 1859
...cannot be : Shadow of annoyance Never came near thee : Thou lovest; but ne'er knew love's sad satiety. Waking or asleep, Thou of death must deem Things more...pain is fraught ; Our sweetest songs are those that toll of saddest thought. Yet if we could scorn Hate, and pride, and fear ; If we were things born Better...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF