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" The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs... "
The poems of Ossian, in the orig. Gaelic, with a tr. into Lat. by R ... - Page 400
by Ossian - 1807
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Empires of the Word: A Language History of the World

Nicholas Ostler - Historical linguistics - 2005 - 615 pages
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A Garden of Words

Martha Barnette - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2005 - 212 pages
...introduction to books about word origins: . . . [T]he Sanskrit language, whatever may be its antiquity, is of wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek,...exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly...
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The Indo-Aryan Controversy: Evidence and Inference in Indian History

Edwin Bryant, Laurie L. Patton - History - 2005 - 522 pages
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Indian Renaissance: British Romantic Art and the Prospect of India

Hermione De Almeida, George H. Gilpin - Art - 2005 - 336 pages
...ancient Sanskrit: The Sanscrit language, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Creek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of the verbs and in the forms of the grammar, than could...
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What Ten Young Men Did

Daṇḍin, Dandin - Fiction - 2005 - 651 pages
...philologist WILLIAM JONES, already in 1786, eulogized the "wonderful structure" of the Sanskrit language as "more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely ref1ned than either." Dandin's writing is a case in point. Nevertheless, our novel stands apart from...
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Languages and Nations: The Dravidian Proof in Colonial Madras

Thomas R. Trautmann - Dravidian philology - 2006 - 304 pages
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Sir William Jones, 1746-94: A Commemoration

William Jones - Biography & Autobiography - 2006 - 169 pages
...the most cited passage of his writings, from his 'Discourse on the Hindus'. 10 I quote it yet again: The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity,...exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly...
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Aryan Idols: Indo-European Mythology as Ideology and Science

Stefan Arvidsson - History - 2006 - 354 pages
...their language, culture, and religion. The locus classicus in "Oriental" Jones's lecture is as follows: The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity,...exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the form of grammar, than could possibly...
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Urdu/Hindi: An Artificial Divide: African Heritage, Mesopotamian Roots ...

Abdul Jamil Khan - Foreign Language Study - 2006 - 400 pages
...that the Sanscrit was introduced into it, by conquerors from other kingdoms in some very remote age. The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity,...exquisitely refined than either; yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs, and in the form of grammar, than could possibly...
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