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" The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs... "
The poems of Ossian, in the orig. Gaelic, with a tr. into Lat. by R ... - Page 408
by Ossian - 1807
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The Quarterly Review, Volume 119

English literature - 1866
...was one of the founders. 'The Sanscrit language, whatever be its * ' Lectures,' 1st Series, p. 139. antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect...than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitelv refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots...
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The Bibliotheca Sacra, Volume 24

Bible - 1867
...oracle of Indian erudition." He introduced it to the notice of the learned in the following words : " The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity,...exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs, and in the forms of grammar than could possibly...
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Shinar, the Scripture record of the confusion of language and the dispersion ...

Dominick M'Causland - Babel, Tower of - 1867 - 48 pages
...Jones, in his first introduction of it to the notice of the Asiatic Society in 1782, describes it as of a wonderful structure, ' more perfect than the...than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than ca either.' When this ancient language came in view, and was submitted to the critical examination...
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The Homilist, Volume 9

Bible - 1867
...at all likely, indeed, that a language written, unlike most ancient tongues, from left to right, " more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either," should have sprung up in India in the very infancy of letters. Long, very long, before we knew anything...
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The Homilist; or, The pulpit for the people, conducted by D ..., Volume 17

David Thomas - 1867
...at all likely, indeed, that a language written, unlike most aucient tongues, from left to right, " more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either," should have sprung up in India in the very infancy of letters. Long, very long, before we knew anything...
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Iliad Book One, Book 1

Homer - Literary Criticism - 2000 - 304 pages
...to the Asiatic Society of Bengal an address, of which the following is a brief extract: The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful...exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly...
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Words on Words: Quotations about Language and Languages

David Crystal, Hilary Crystal - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2000 - 580 pages
...understand. Samuel Johnson, 1755, Л Dictionary of the English Language, Preface 16:43 The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful...exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs, and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly...
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The Presence of Self

R. S. Perinbanayagam - Social Science - 2000 - 299 pages
...to students of historical linguistics: The Sanskrit language, whatever may be its antiquity, is of wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek,...exquisitely refined than either; yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in roots of verbs and in forms of grammar, than could have been produced...
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The Rise of Modern Mythology, 1680-1860

Burton Feldman, Estate of Margaret M Feldman Burton Feldman, Robert D. Richardson, Richard D. Richardson - Literary Criticism - 1972 - 564 pages
...however, was his observation, in 1786, that The Sanskrit language, whatever may be its antiquity, is of wonderful structure: more perfect than the Greek,...exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could have...
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The Oxford Guide to Literature in English Translation

Peter France - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2001 - 656 pages
...Enlightenment. With the discovery of Sanskrit [II.1.2], which Sir William Jones in 1796 declared to be 'of wonderful structure, more perfect than the Greek,...Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either', the new discipline of comparative philology was born, which led to the conceptualization of the IndoEuropean...
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