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" The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs... "
The poems of Ossian, in the orig. Gaelic, with a tr. into Lat. by R ... - Page 408
by Ossian - 1807
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Allen's Indian Mail and Register of Intelligence for British ..., Volume 10

China - 1852
...Colebrooke, Carey, and Wilkins, by their successive labours, disclosed the bidden stores of a language " more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either." Bat though these great pioneers had thus cleared the path, like the ascent to the temple of Virtue...
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India and Its Inhabitants

Caleb Wright - India - 1852 - 304 pages
...than three thousand years ; it is written in Sanscrit, a dead language of a " wonderful construction —more perfect than the Greek, more copious than...Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either." It is a portion of the Holy Vedas. In a peculiar tone of voice, he chants the sacred text, stopping...
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Allen's Indian Mail, and Register of Intelligence for British and ..., Volume 10

1852
...Colebrooke, Carey, and Wilkins, by their successive labours, disclosed the hidden stores of a language " more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either." But though these great pioneers had thus cleared the path, like the ascent to the temple of Virtue...
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The National Magazine, Volume 1

Abel Stevens, James Floy - American essays - 1852
...advocate of Sanscrit Literature, whose opinion of that language is given in his assertion that it was "more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more excellently refined than either," Professor Wilson and Dr. Milman have given various specimens of the...
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Language as a Means of Mental Culture and International ..., Volume 1

Claude Marcel - Language and languages - 1853 - 416 pages
...is peculiarly favourable for philological investigations. "This language," observes Sir W. Jones, " whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure...exquisitely refined than either ; yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly...
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Outlines of Comparative Philology: With a Sketch of the Languages of Europe ...

Maximilian Schele de Vere - Comparative linguistics - 1853 - 434 pages
...understanding, and unveil the real origin, character, and meaning. Already Sir W. Jones thought the Sanscrit more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either. Mr. Brian Hodgson, a competent and impartial judge, called it a speech capable of giving a soul to...
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Outlines of Comparative Philology: With a Sketch of the Languages of Europe ...

Maximilian Schele de Vere - Comparative linguistics - 1853 - 434 pages
...understanding, and unveil the real origin, character, and meaning. Already Sir W. Jones thought the Sanscrit more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either. Mr. Brian Hodgson, a competent and impartial judge, called it a speech capable of giving a soul to...
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The Collected Works of Dugald Stewart, Volume 4

Dugald Stewart - 1854
...before the sera of historical record."2 " Whatever be its antiquity," says Sir William Jones, " it is of a wonderful structure, more perfect than the...than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either,3 yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both from both those tongues, as Arabic religion...
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The Collected Works of Dugald Stewart: Elements of the philosophy of the ...

Dugald Stewart - 1854
...before the sera of historical record."2 " Whatever be its antiquity," says Sir William Jones, " it is of a wonderful structure, more perfect than the...than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either,3 yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both from both those tongues, as Arabic religion...
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The land of the Veda: India briefly described in some of its aspects ...

Peter Percival - 1854
...etymology." Sir William Jones's enraptured mind thus embodied its impressions : " It is a language of wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek,...Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either." Talboys applies to Sanscrit the praise bestowed on Greek by Gibbon. " It is," says he, " a musical...
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