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" The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs... "
The poems of Ossian, in the orig. Gaelic, with a tr. into Lat. by R ... - Page 408
by Ossian - 1807
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Representing India: Indian Culture and Imperial Control in ..., Volume 1

Michael J. Franklin - Deccan (India) - 2000 - 483 pages
...'Third Anniversary Discourse' to the Asiatick Society, which contains the following famous passage: The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than ihe Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both...
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Genetic, Linguistic and Archaeological Perspectives on Human Diversity in ...

Li Jin, Mark Seielstad, Chunjie Xiao - History - 2001 - 188 pages
...locate the homeland of speakers of ancient languages. 3. To date splits among languages. "The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful...exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a strong affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly...
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The Quest for the Origins of Vedic Culture: The Indo-Aryan Migration Debate

Edwin Bryant - Religion - 2003 - 387 pages
...quotation, has by now become the mangaldcdra of comparative philology: The Sanskrit language, whatever may be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more...exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly...
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The Sanskrit Language

Thomas Burrow - Sanskrit language - 2001 - 438 pages
...outlines the significance of the new discovery : ' The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of wonderful structure ; more perfect than the Greek,...exquisitely refined than either ; yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity both in the roots of verbs and the forms of grammar, than could possibly...
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Simplifications: An Introduction to Structuralism and Post-structuralism

Aniket Jaaware - Linguistics in literature - 2001 - 559 pages
...Bengal Asiatic Society, Calcutta, in 1786: The Sanskrit language, whatever may be its antiquity, is of wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek,...exquisitely refined than either; yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could have...
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Linguistics: An Introduction to Language and Communication

Adrian Akmajian, Richard A. Demer, Ann K. Farmer, Robert M. Harnish - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2001 - 604 pages
...the classical and other ancient languages was Sir William Jones, who wrote in 1786 that The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful...perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin ... yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of...
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Shelley Among Others: The Play of the Intertext and the Idea of Language

Stuart Peterfreund - Literary Criticism - 2002 - 406 pages
...Rickman (Letters, 1:344). From Jones's "Third Anniversary Discourse" (1786), Shelley would have known that "The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity,...exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity . . . than could possibly have been produced by accident." And Shelley...
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Serial Verbs in Oceanic: A Descriptive Typology

Terry Crowley - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2002 - 281 pages
...Indo-European tthough without that name) and the related idea of language families back in l786: The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful...exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly...
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The Linguistics Encyclopedia

Kirsten Malmkjær, Professor Kirsten Malmkjaer - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2002 - 643 pages
...the same origin, which perhaps no longer existed. In his words (in Lehmann 1967: 15): The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful...exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly...
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Comparative Arawakan Histories: Rethinking Language Family and Culture Area ...

Jonathan D. Hill, Fernando Santos-Granero - Foreign Language Study - 2002 - 340 pages
...English. The often-quoted observation states that "The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity is of wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek,...exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly...
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