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" ... uncle, My father's brother, but no more like my father Than I to Hercules: within a month, Ere yet the salt of most unrighteous tears Had left the flushing in her galled eyes, She married. "
The Works of Shakespeare: In Eight Volumes : Collated with the Oldest Copies ... - Page 114
by William Shakespeare - 1762
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The New American Speaker: A Collection of Oratorical and Dramatical Pieces ...

John Celivergos Zachos - Elocution - 1851 - 552 pages
...longer, — married with my uncle. My father's brother ; but no more like my father, Than I to Hercules : It is not. nor it cannot come to good ; But break, my heart ; for I must hold my tongue ! 8HAK8PKARB HAMLET ON HIS OWN IRRESOLUTION. • OH, what a rogue and peasant slave...
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Hamlet

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1980 - 383 pages
...her galled eyes, She married. O, most wicked speed, to post With such dexterity to incestuous sheets! It is not, nor it cannot come to good. But break, my heart, for I must hold my tongue. Enter Horatio, Marcellus, and Barnardo HORATIO Hail to your lordship! 160 HAMLET...
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Shakespeare's Soliloquies

Wolfgang Clemen - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 211 pages
...galled eyes, 1 55 She married — O most wicked speed! To post With such dexterity to incestuous sheets! It is not, nor it cannot come to good. But break, my heart, for I must hold my tongue. Hamlet's first soliloquy occurs in the middle of the scene in which he makes his...
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Child Sexual Abuse: A Handbook for Health Care and Legal Professionals

Diane H. Schetky, Arthur H. Green - Family & Relationships - 1988 - 248 pages
...and History Diane H. Schetky Oh most wicked speed to post with such dexterity to incestuous sheets. It is not nor it cannot come to good. But break, my heart, for I must hold my tongue.— Hamlet, Act 1, Sc. 2 This chapter will explore sexual abuse as depicted in...
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Shakespeare: Text, Subtext, and Context

Ronald L. Dotterer - Literary Criticism - 1989 - 234 pages
...in the sun"; "I know not seems." His subtext may be inferred from his first soliloquy's last lines: "It is not, nor it cannot come to good, / But break my heart, for I must hold my tongue" (1.2.158-59). Thus Gordon Craig conceived Hamlet for his famous 1912 Moscow Art...
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An Audition Handbook of Great Speeches

Jerry Blunt - Acting - 1990 - 207 pages
...her galled eyes, She married. O most wicked speed, to post With such dexterity to incestuous sheets. It is not, nor it cannot come to good. But break, my heart, for I must hold my tongue. (69) Act I, Scene 3: Elsinore has two families. The first's name, taken from a...
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Hamlet

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1992 - 138 pages
...galled eyes, She married. O most wicked speed, to post With such dexterity to incestuous sheets! " It is not (nor it cannot come to) good. But break, my heart, for I must hold my tongue. Enter HORATIO, MARCELLUS and BARNARDO. HORATIO Hail to your lordship! HAMLET I...
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Some Necessary Questions of the Play: A Stage-centered Analysis of ...

Gene A. Smith, Robert E. Wood - History - 1994 - 171 pages
...images for the most part suggest a continued allegiance to classical rhetoric. Even his conclusion — "It is not nor it cannot come to good, / But break my heart for I must hold my tongue" — reflects both an implicit faith that wrongdoing cannot survive and a continued...
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Selected Poems

William Shakespeare - Poetry - 1995 - 128 pages
...her galled eyes, She married. O, most wicked speed, to post With such dexterity to incestuous sheets! It is not nor it cannot come to good. But break my heart, for I must hold my tongue. 18 There - my blessing with thee, And these few precepts in thy memory Look thou...
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Shakespeare the Playwright: A Companion to the Complete Tragedies, Histories ...

Victor L. Cahn - Drama - 1996 - 865 pages
...further a play whose involvements are already overwhelming. Finally Hamlet reveals his final agony: It is not, nor it cannot come to good. But break my heart, for I must hold my tongue. (I, ii, 158-159) Hamlet can tell no one of his anguish. He must bear his agony...
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