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Books Books 71 - 80 of 182 on ... uncle, My father's brother, but no more like my father Than I to Hercules: within....
" ... uncle, My father's brother, but no more like my father Than I to Hercules: within a month, Ere yet the salt of most unrighteous tears Had left the flushing in her galled eyes, She married. "
The Works of Shakespeare: In Eight Volumes : Collated with the Oldest Copies ... - Page 114
by William Shakespeare - 1762
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The Speaker; Or, Miscellaneous Pieces: Selected from the Best English ...

William Enfield - Elocution - 1827 - 346 pages
...galled eyes, She married ! O, most wicked speed, to post With such dexterity to incestuous sheets ! It is not, nor it cannot come to good. But break, my heart, for I must hold my tongue. CHAP. XXIII. HAMLET AND GHOST. Ham. ANGELS and ministers of grace defend us !...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare, Volume 8

William Shakespeare, William Harness - 1830
...galled eyes, She married : — O most wicked speed, to post With such dexterity to incestuous sheets ! It is not, nor it cannot come to, good ; But break, my heart ; for I must hold my tongue ! Enter HORATIO, BERNARDO, and MARCELLUS. Hor. Hail to your lordship ! Ham. I am...
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The Dramatic Works, Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1831
...galled eyes, She married : — О most wicked speed, to post With such dexterity to incestuous sheets ! It is not, nor it cannot come to, good ; But break, my heart: for I must hold my tonge! Enter Horatio, Bernardo, and M arcellus. /for. Hail to your lordship. Hain. l am...
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The Dramatic Works, Volume 2

William Shakespeare, George Steevens - 1831
...eyes, She married : — О most wicked speed, to post With such dexterity to incestuous sheets ! It ia not, nor it cannot come to, good ; But break, my heart: for I must hold my tonge! Enter Horatio, Bernardo, anil Marccllus. Hor. Hail to your lordship. Htm. I am...
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Principles of Elocution: Containing Numerous Rules, Observations, and ...

Thomas Ewing - 1832
...even she, Married mine uncle, my father's brother, But no more like my father, than I to Hercules. — It is not, nor it cannot come to good. — But, break my heart, for I must hold my tongue. — SHAKSPEARE. 6. — MACBETH'S SOLILOQUV BEFORE MURDERING DUNCAN. Go, bid thy...
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Select plays from Shakspeare; adapted for the use of schools and young ...

William Shakespeare - History - 1836
...allusion is to the contention between those gods for the preference in music. — Hyperion for Hyperion. It is not, nor it cannot come to, good ; But break, my heart; for I must hold my tongue ! Enter HORATIO, BERNARDO, and MARCELLUS. Hor. Hail to your lordship ! Ham. I am...
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King Lear. Romeo and Juliet. Hamlet. Othello

William Shakespeare, Charles Symmons, John Payne Collier - 1836
...eyes, — She married. — O most wicked speed, to post With such dexterity to incestuous sheets ! It is not, nor it cannot come to, good ; But break, my heart ; for I must hold my tongue ! Enter HORATIO, BERNARDO, and MARCELLUS. Hor. Hail to your lordship ! Ham. I am...
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De Clifford; or, The constant man, by the author of 'Tremaine'.

Robert Plumer Ward, De Clifford (fict.name.) - 1841
...dignified ; full of modesty — full of sweetness; a blooming rose, a graceful myrtle ! Such union is not, nor it cannot come to good: — ' But break, my heart, for I must hold my tongue.'" Here I confess my firmness gave way ; my bravery failed ; I felt all the bitterness...
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De Clifford: Or, The Constant Man, Volume 1

Robert Plumer Ward - England - 1841
...and dignified; full of modesty—full of sweetness; a blooming rose, a graceful myrtle ! Such union is not, nor it cannot come to good :— ' But break my heart, for I must hold my tongue."' Here I confess my firmness gave way ; my bravery failed ; I felt all the bitterness...
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Address of John Quincy Adams, to His Constituents of the Twelfth ...

Slavery - 1842 - 63 pages
...his morals, forced itself upon my observation, and I was ready to say, like Shakspeare's Hamlet — " It is not, nor it cannot come to good ; But break my heart ; for I must hold my tongue At the meeting of the second session of this Congress last December, I perceived...
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