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" The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs... "
Life in India - Page 29
by Caleb Wright - 1854 - 304 pages
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The Linguistics Encyclopedia

Kirsten Malmkjær, Professor Kirsten Malmkjaer - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2002 - 643 pages
...(in Lehmann 1967: 15): The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar,...
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A History of Language Philosophies

Lia Formigari - Philosophy - 2004 - 250 pages
...of a Persian grammar. He described Sanskrit as a language characterized by a 'wonderful structure', more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar,...
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A Textbook of Historiography, 500 B.C. to A.D. 2000

E. Sreedharan - Historiography - 2004 - 570 pages
...of the new revelations, not always warranted by the sources. Jones had found the Sanskrit language "more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either "" He labored to show that the Indian division of the Zodiac was not borrowed from the Greeks or Arabs;...
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Romantische Wissenspoetik: die Künste und die Wissenschaften um 1800

Gabriele Brandstetter, Gerhard Neumann - Arts - 2004 - 418 pages
...die Idealisierungen: The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a strenger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar...
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A Garden of Words

Martha Barnette - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2005 - 212 pages
...word origins: . . . [T]he Sanskrit language, whatever may be its antiquity, is of wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar,...
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Die Verfassung der Freiheit

Friedrich August von Hayek, Alfred Bosch - Social Science - 2005 - 575 pages
...1807, III, S. 34: »The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar,...
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Body Matters: Simple Secrets for Elegant Aging

Darca Lee Nicholson, BFA, MA, CMT - Hymns, English - 2007 - 246 pages
...February 2, 1786 said: The Sanskrit language, whatever its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar,...
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The Invention of World Religions: Or, How European Universalism Was ...

Tomoko Masuzawa - Religion - 2005 - 359 pages
...Bengal, Jones declared: The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar,...
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What Ten Young Men Did

Daṇḍin, Dandin - Fiction - 2005 - 651 pages
...philologist WILLIAM JONES, already in 1786, eulogized the "wonderful structure" of the Sanskrit language as "more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely ref1ned than either." Dandin's writing is a case in point. Nevertheless, our novel stands apart from...
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The Yoga of Sound: Tapping the Hidden Power of Music and Chant

Russill Paul - Health & Fitness - 2010 - 336 pages
...resonance of sacred sound. "The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar,...
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