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" The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs... "
Life in India - Page 29
by Caleb Wright - 1854 - 304 pages
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History in English Words

Owen Barfield - Language Arts & Disciplines - 1967 - 240 pages
...Sanskrit languages. In 1786 Sir William Jones described that language as being 'of wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than i9 either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms...
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Christians and Missionaries in India: Cross-cultural Communication Since ...

Robert Eric Frykenberg, Alaine M. Low - Religion - 2003 - 419 pages
...linguistics. Jones said: The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affmity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar,...
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The Handbook of Linguistics

Mark Aronoff, Janie Rees-Miller - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2003 - 840 pages
...(17461794) statement in 1786: The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either; yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar,...
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Fortunes of History: Historical Inquiry from Herder to Huizinga

Donald R. Kelley - History - 2008 - 448 pages
...in 1786 in this way: "The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of the verbs and the forms of the...
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Imagining Hinduism: A Postcolonial Perspective

Sharada Sugirtharajah - Religion - 2003 - 164 pages
...poets and philosophers such as Homer, Plato, and Pindar. Jones speaks of the Sanskrit language as being "more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin and more exquisitely refined than either" (ibid.: 26). 2S Jones' representation of Hinduism needs to be seen in the light of his predetermined...
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The Variegated Plumage: Encounters with Indian Philosophy : a Commemoration ...

Narendranath B. Patil - Hindu philosophy - 2003 - 387 pages
...philology: "The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar,...
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Os portugueses e o Oriente: Sião, China, Japão 1840-1940 : mostra ...

Biblioteca Nacional (Portugal) - China - 2004 - 126 pages
...original e perfeita: «The Sonskrit longuage, whutever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure, more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the...Latin and more exquisitely refined than either»". E o feitiço volta-se inesperadamente contra o feiticeiro: com a descoberta de textos religiosos anteriores...
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The Silk Road: Two Thousand Years in the Heart of Asia

Frances Wood - Art - 2002 - 270 pages
...Asiatic Society of Bengal, 'the first Englishman to know Sanskrit', said of that language that it was 'more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the...Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either'. The entry in Buckland's Dictionary of Indian Biography (1906) noted the deleterious effects of these...
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Irish Orientalism: A Literary and Intellectual History

Joseph Lennon - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 478 pages
...between India and Europe: The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar,...
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A Modern Theory of Language Evolution

Carl J. Becker - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2004 - 412 pages
...the words of Jones: The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is a of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin and more exquisitely refined than either; yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar,...
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