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" The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs... "
Life in India - Page 29
by Caleb Wright - 1854 - 304 pages
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Representing India: Indian Culture and Imperial Control in Eighteenth ...

Michael J. Franklin - Asia - 2000 - 576 pages
...has prevailed in it. The Sarfcrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful ftructure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquifitely refined than either; yet bearing to both of them a Wronger affinity, both in the roots...
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Simplifications: An Introduction to Structuralism and Post-structuralism

Aniket Jaaware - Linguistics in literature - 2001 - 559 pages
...Calcutta, in 1786: The Sanskrit language, whatever may be its antiquity, is of wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either; yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar,...
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The Quest for the Origins of Vedic Culture: The Indo-Aryan Migration Debate

Edwin Bryant - Religion - 2003 - 387 pages
...comparative philology: The Sanskrit language, whatever may be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar,...
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Genetic, Linguistic and Archaeological Perspectives on Human Diversity in ...

Li Jin, Mark Seielstad, Chunjie Xiao - History - 2001 - 188 pages
...splits among languages. "The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a strong affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar,...
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The Sanskrit Language

Thomas Burrow - Sanskrit language - 2001 - 438 pages
...the new discovery : ' The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of wonderful structure ; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either ; yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity both in the roots of verbs and the forms of grammar,...
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Geschichte der Sprachwissenschaften. Bd. 2/2.: Ein internationales Handbuch ...

Sylvain Auroux - Historical linguistics - 2001 - 912 pages
...Jones made in 1786: "The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure: more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar,...
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Serial Verbs in Oceanic: A Descriptive Typology

Terry Crowley - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2002 - 281 pages
...families back in l786: The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure: more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar,...
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Comparative Arawakan Histories: Rethinking Language Family and Culture Area ...

Jonathan D. Hill, Fernando Santos-Granero - Foreign Language Study - 2002 - 340 pages
...observation states that "The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity is of wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar,...
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Shelley Among Others: The Play of the Intertext and the Idea of Language

Stuart Peterfreund - Literary Criticism - 2002 - 406 pages
...would have known that "The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity . . . than could possibly have been produced by accident."...
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The Linguistics Encyclopedia

Kirsten Malmkjær, Professor Kirsten Malmkjaer - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2002 - 643 pages
...(in Lehmann 1967: 15): The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar,...
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