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" He is about it: The doors are open ; and the surfeited grooms Do mock their charge with snores: I have drugg'd their possets, That death and nature do contend about them, Whether they live or die. "
The Works of Shakespear: King Lear. Timon of Athens. Titus Andronicus. Macbeth - Page 294
by William Shakespeare - 1768
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The Plays, Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1824
...surfeited grooms * Haft. f Drops, Do mock their charge with snores : I have drugg'd their possets, That death and nature do contend about them, Whether they live or die. Macb. [Wit/ma.] Who's there? — what, ho! Lady M. Alack ! I am afraid they have awak'd, And 'tis not...
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The British Theatre: Or, A Collection of Plays, which are Acted at ..., Volume 5

Mrs. Inchbald - English drama - 1824
...are open ; and the surfeited grooms Do mock their charge with snores : I have drugg'd their possets, That death and nature do contend about them, Whether they live or die. Maeb. [Within.] Who's there? — what, ho! Lady. Alack ! I am afraid they have awaked, And 'tis not...
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The Juvenile Mentor; Or, Select Readings ...

Albert Picket - 1825 - 262 pages
...marvell'd at my words • but hold thce still ; Things, bad begun, make strong themselves by ill. Alas, I am afraid they have awak'd. And 'tis not done ; th' attempt and not the deed, Confounds us Kark !— I laid the daggers leady, He could not miss them. Had he not resembled My father as he...
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The Works of Shakspeare: From the Text of Johnson, Steevens, and Reed

William Shakespeare - Actors - 1825 - 896 pages
...are open ; and the surfeited grooms Do mock their charge with snores : I have drugg'c their posset*, d so mnch blood in Doct. Do you mark that? [him? Lady M. The thane of Macb. (Within.) Who's there 1— what, ho ! Lady M. Alack ! I am afraid they have awak'd And 'tis not...
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The dramatic works of William Shakspeare, with notes original and ..., Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1826
...are open; and the surfeited grooms Do mock their charge with snores: I have drugg'd their possets, That death and nature do contend about them, Whether they live or die. Macb. [Within.] Who's there?—what, ho! LadyM. Alack! I am afraid, they have awak'd, And 'tis not...
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The plays of William Shakspeare, pr. from the text by G. Steevens ..., Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1826
...are open : and the surfeited grooms Do mock their charge with snores : I have drugg'd their possets, That death and nature do contend about them, Whether they live, or die. Macb. [within.] Who's there? — what, ho? Lady M. Alack ! I am afraid they have awak'd, And 'tis not...
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The Spectator: Corrected from the Originals, Volume 7

1827
...will imagine her even affrighted with the sound of her own voice while she is speaking it. ' Alas ! I am afraid they have awak'd, And 'tis not done ; th' attempt and not the deed Confounds us— Hark ! — I laid the daggers ready, He could not miss them. Had he not resembled My father as...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - 1827 - 791 pages
...are open ; and the surfeited grooms Do mock their charge with snoreĽ : I have drngg-d their possets. nothing of Macb. [tVithin.] Who's there ?— what, ho ! Lady U. Alack ! I am afraid they have nwak'd, And 'tis...
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The Dramatic Works of Shakespeare: With a Life, Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1828
...about it : The doors are open ; and the surfeited grooms Do mock their charge with snores : I have That death and nature do contend about them. Whether they live or die. Macb. \mthin.} Who's there?— what, ho ! LadyM. Alack! I am afraid, they have awak'd, And 'tis not...
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The London Encyclopaedia: Or, Universal Dictionary of Science, Art ..., Volume 3

Thomas Curtis - Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1829
...traitors, And make us lose the good we oft might win By fearing to attempt. Id. °feature far M future. Alack ! I am afraid, they have awak'd, And 'tis not done ; th* attempt, and not the deed, Confounds ui. Id. Macbeth. He flatt'ring bis displeasure, Tript me behind ; got praises of the king, For him...
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