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" I do despise my dream. Make less thy body, hence, and more thy grace; Leave gormandizing; know, the grave doth gape For thee thrice wider than for other men... "
The plays of William Shakspeare, with the corrections and illustr. of ... - Page 181
by William Shakespeare - 1807
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King Richard II. King Henry IV, part 1. King Henry IV, part 2. Henry V

William Shakespeare - 1826
...that vain man. Ch. Just. Have you your wits ? know you what 'tis you speak ? Fal. My king ! my Jove ! I speak to thee, my heart ! King. I know thee not,...a kind of man, So surfeit-swell'd, so old, and so profane4; 2 A similar scene occurs in the anonymous old play of King Henry V. FalstafT and bis companions...
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Plays of William Shakespeare, Volumes 17-18

William Shakespeare - 1826 - 960 pages
...your wits ? know you what 'tis you speak ? Fal My king ! my Jove ! I speak to thee, my heart! Xing. well sav'd, a world too wide For his shrunk shank...toward childish treble, pipes And whistles in his surfcit-swcll'd, so old, and so profane ; But, being awake, I do despise my dream. Make less thy body,...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - 1827 - 791 pages
...you your wits ? know you what 'tis you speak ? Fal. My king ! my Jove ! I speak to thee, rajheart ! 0 ׈ v I -have long dream'd of such a kind of man, So surfeit-swell'd, so old, and so profane ; But, being...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare, George Steevens - 1829
...тат man. Ch. /luí. Have you your wits ? know you what 'tis you speak 7 Fal. My king ! my Jove ! I speak to thee, my heart ! King. I know thee not,...jester ! I have long dream'd of such a kind of man, So surfeit-swcll'd, so old, and so profane ; But, being awake, I do despise my dream. Make less thy body,...
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The London encyclopaedia, or, Universal dictionary of science, art ..., Volume 9

Thomas Curtis (of Grove house sch, Islington)
...an idle horseboy, he will never after fall to labour : but is only made fit for the halter. Spenser. I know thee not, old man ; fall to thy prayers : How ill white hairs become a fool and jester. Shakspeare. Scrcn times already hath Israel mutinied against Moses, and seven times hath cither been...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare, Volume 5

William Shakespeare, William Harness - 1830
...that vain man. Ch. Just. Have you your wits ? know you what 'tis you speak ? Fal. My king ! my Jove ! I speak to thee, my heart ! King. I know thee not,...white hairs become a fool, and jester ! I have long dream 'd of such a kind of man, * "Tii all in aery part.] We should read, " Tis all in all, and all...
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The Dramatic Works, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1831 - 504 pages
...that vain man. <'h. .Jmt. Have you your wits ? know you what 'tis you speak / Fal. My king ! my Jove ! I speak to thee, my heart ! King. I know thee not,...; How ill white hairs become a fool, and jester I I have long dream'd of such a kind of man, So surfeil-swell'd, so old, and so profane ; But, bein<r...
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The plays and poems of Shakspeare [according to the text of E ..., Volume 7

William Shakespeare - 1833
...vain man. Ch. Jus. Have you your wits ? Know you what 'tis you speak ? Jim ; Fal, My king ! my Jove ! I speak to thee, my heart! King. I know thee not,...a kind of man, So surfeit-swell'd, so old, and so profane ; But, being awake, I do despise my dream. Make less thy body, hence,1 and more thy grace ;...
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Henry IV, pt. 2. Henry V. Henry VI, pts. 1-3

William Shakespeare - 1836
...Falstaff and his companions address the king in the same manner, and are dismissed as in this play. King. I know thee not, old man. Fall to thy prayers...white hairs become a fool, and jester ! I have long dreamed of such a kind of man, So surfeit-swelled, so old, and so profane ; 1 But, being awake, I do...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1837 - 466 pages
...you what 'tis you speak ? 1'nl. My king ! my Jove ! I speak to thec, my heart ! Xing'. I know thce not, old man : Fall to thy prayers ; How ill white...jester ! I have long dream'd of such a kind of man, So surfcit-swell'd, so old, and so profane ; But, being awake. I do despise my dream. Make less thy body,...
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