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" ... our sage and serious poet Spenser, whom I dare be known to think a better teacher than Scotus or Aquinas, describing true temperance under the person of Guion, brings him in with his Palmer through the cave of Mammon, and the bower of earthly bliss,... "
Recollections of a Literary Life, Or, Books, Places, and People - Page 344
by Mary Russell Mitford - 1853
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Bases of belief

Edward Miall - Christianity - 1861 - 268 pages
...poet Spenser (whom I dare be known to think a better teacher than Scotus or Aquinas), describing due temperance under the person of Guion, brings him in...earthly bliss, that he might see, and know, and yet abstain.'"—British Churches, 8vo, pp. 26—31. unfaithfulness to their appointed mission cannot be...
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Selections from the prose writings of John Milton, ed. with memoir, notes ...

John [prose Milton (selected]) - 1862
...and rejects it, is but a blank virtue, not a pure ; her whiteness is but an excremental whiteness;* which was the reason why our sage and serious poet...bliss, that he might see and know, and yet abstain. WE CANNOT EXCLUDE TEMPTATION FROM THE WORLD. If we think to regulate printing, thereby to rectify manners,...
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The Monthly Journal of the American Unitarian Association, Volume 3

American Unitarian Association - Unitarian churches - 1862
...divinity. Dr. Channing says this of Milton ; and Milton, before him, said the same of Spenser, — " our sage and serious poet Spenser, whom I dare be...to think a better teacher than Scotus or Aquinas." But not only poets, the better class of theologians are also continually coming nearer to this view...
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The Churchman's family magazine, Volume 1

...That which puriSes us is trial, and trial is by what is contrary, which was the reason why our sage, serious poet, Spenser (whom I dare be known to think...Aquinas), describing true temperance under the person of Guyon, brings him with his palmer through the Cave of Mammon and the Bower of Bliss, that he might...
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Foliorum centuriae, selections for translation into Latin and Greek prose ...

Hubert Ashton Holden - 1864
...and rejects it, is but a blank virtue, not a pure ; her whiteness is but an excremental whiteness ; which was the reason why our sage and serious poet...— describing true temperance under the person of Guyon, brings him in with his Palmer through the cave of Mammon and the Bower of earthly Bliss, that...
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Treasures from the Prose Writings of John Milton

John Milton - 1866 - 486 pages
...and rejects it, is but a blank virtue, not a pure ; her whiteness is but an excremental whiteness; which was the reason why our sage and serious poet...bliss, that he might see and know, and yet abstain. Since therefore the knowledge and survey of vice is in this world so necessary to the constituting...
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The path on earth to the gate of heaven, essays

Frederick Arnold - 1866
...That which purifies is trial, and trial is by what is contrary ; which was the reason why our sage, serious poet Spenser — whom I dare be known to think...— describing true temperance under the person of Guyon, brings him, with his palmer, through the Cave of Mammon and the Bower of Bliss, that he might...
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The History, Object, and Proper Observance of the Holy Season of Lent

William Ingraham Kip - Lent - 1867 - 236 pages
...trial, and trial is by what is contrary. Which was the reason why our sage and serious poet Spencer, describing true Temperance under the person of Guion,...bliss, that he might see and know, and yet abstain." Yet it is evident, on the other hand, that a temporary retirement from the bustle and tumult of this...
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Bible illustrations: consisting of apophthegms [ &c.], grouped ..., Volume 6

James Lee (M.A.) - 1867
...it, is but a blank virtue. — Miltcni. This was the reason why our sage and serious poet, Spenser, describing true temperance under the person of Guion,...bliss, that he might see and know, and yet abstain. — Anon. The habit of virtue cannot be formed in a closet. Habits are formed by acts of reason, in...
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Studies in English prose: specimens, with notes, by J. Payne

Joseph Payne - 1868
...rejects it, is but a blank3 virtue, not a pure ;3 her whiteness is but an excremental4 whiteness ; which was the reason why our sage and serious poet...(whom I dare be known to think a better teacher than [Duns] Scotus four elements composing this material world, with a fifth essence peculiar to God and...
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