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" All the images of Nature were still present to him, and he drew them, not laboriously, but luckily ; when he describes anything, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation: he... "
The anniversary calendar, natal book, and universal mirror - Page 734
by Anniversary calendar - 1832
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Specimens of the British Poets: With Biographical and Critical Notices, and ...

Thomas Campbell - Authors, English - 1841 - 716 pages
...greater commendation : he was naturally learned ; he needed not the spectacles of books to read naturo ; he looked Inwards, and found her there. I cannot say he Is everywhere alike ; were he so, I should do him injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind....
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A Critical History of English Literature, Vol. 2, Volume 2

David Daiches - 1979 - 289 pages
...not be so analyzed; he drew on th& images of Nature "not laboriously, but luckily"; "he needed not the spectacles of books to read Nature; he looked inwards, and found her there." Jonson was thus the more respected in the seventeenth century because his plays were more amenable...
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Sources of Dramatic Theory: Volume 1, Plato to Congreve

Michael J. Sidnell, Sidnell Michael J., D. J. Conacher - Drama - 1991 - 317 pages
...to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation: he was naturally learned: he needed not the spectacles of books to read Nature: he looked...is every where alike: were he so, I should do him inlury to compare him with the greatest of mankind, He is many times flat, insipid: his comic wit degenerating...
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William Shakespeare: The Critical Heritage, Volume 5

Brian Vickers - Literary Criticism - 1995 - 568 pages
...to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation: he was naturally learned: he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature; he looked...injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind. He is many times flat and insipid; his comick wit degenerating into clenches, his serious swelling...
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Textual Practice 10.3

Alan Sinfield - Literary Criticism - 1996 - 167 pages
...to have wanted learning give him the greater commendation. He was naturally learned. He needed not the spectacles of books to read nature. He looked inwards, and found her there. 44 As Dobson has pointed out, this presentation of the 'naturalness' of Shakespeare was a common tactic...
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Russian Essays on Shakespeare and His Contemporaries

Aleksandr Tikhonovich Parfenov, Joseph G. Price - Drama - 1998 - 209 pages
...nature of Shakespeare's genius, in particular that of a poet of tragedy: I cannot say he is everywhere alike; were he so, I should do him injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind. He is many times flat, insipid; his comic wit degenerating into clenches, his serious swelling into...
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A Sociobiology Compendium: Aphorisms, Sayings, Asides

Delbert D. Thiessen - Social Science - 1998 - 151 pages
...observations of the body in health and disease to learn the truth. He was naturally learned; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature; he looked inwards and found her there. John Dry den English poet He first wrote, wine is the strongest. The second wrote, the king is strongest....
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The Just and the Lively: The Literary Criticism of John Dryden

Michael Werth Gelber - Literary Criticism - 2002 - 342 pages
...commendation: he was naturally learn'd; he needed not the spectacles of Books to read Nature; he look'd inwards, and found her there. I cannot say he is every...injury to compare him with the greatest of Mankind. He is many times flat, insipid; his Comick wit degenerating into clenches, his serious swelling into...
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La comedia española y el teatro europeo del siglo XVII

Henry W. Sullivan, Raúl A. Galoppe, Mahlon L. Stoutz - Foreign Language Study - 1999 - 193 pages
...podemos aplicarle el juicio que John Dryden hace sobre Shakespeare: "I cannot say he is everywhere alike; were he so, I should do him injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind" (No puedo decir que sea en todo igual, si así fuera, lo dañaría al compararlo con los más grandes...
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Studies in Criticism and Aest

Howard Anderson - Aesthetics, British - 1999 - 419 pages
...in Mannerist theory a century earlier. Shakespeare had a genius sufficient to itself, "he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature; he looked inwards and found her there." (For "books" read "mathematics," and the statement is identical with the doctrine of the Mannerists...
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