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" All the images of Nature were still present to him, and he drew them, not laboriously, but luckily ; when he describes anything, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation: he... "
The anniversary calendar, natal book, and universal mirror - Page 734
by Anniversary calendar - 1832
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The Young Lady's Book of Elegant Prose: Comprising Selections from the Works ...

American literature - 1836 - 320 pages
...to have wanted learning give him the greater commendation : he was naturally learned ; he nceded not the spectacles of books to read nature ; he looked inwards, and found her there. I cannot say he is everywhere alike ; were he so, I should do him injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind....
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The Works of John Dryden: In Verse and Prose, with a Life, Volume 2

John Dryden, John Mitford - English literature - 1836
...have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation : he was naturally learned ; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature ; he looked inwards, and found her there. I cannot say he is everywhere alike ; were he so, I should do him injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind....
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Thirty Years Ago: Or, The Memoirs of a Water Drinker, Volume 1

William Dunlap - Drinking in literature - 1836
...maybe collected asystem of civil and economical prudence." — Johnson. "He (Shakspeare) needed not the spectacles of books to read nature; he looked inwards, and found her there." — Oryden. SPIFFARD had a predilection for aged companions. Old age is reverenced for its supposed...
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Allgemeine encyclopädie der wissenschaften und künste in alphabetischer ...

Encyclopedias and dictionaries, German - 1836
...wanted learning, give him the greater recommandation: he «as naturelly learned; he needed not tlio spectacles of books to read nature; he looked inwards, and found her there etc." 23) „Shakespeare," fagt er, „is many times flat and insipid ; his cooiirk wit degenerating...
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A Practical System of Rhetoric; or the principles and rules of style ...

Samuel Phillips Newman - English language - 1837 - 292 pages
...have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation : he was natu-rally learned ; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature; he looked...injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind. He is many times flat, insipid; his comic wit degenerating into clenches, his serious swelling into...
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A Practical System of Rhetoric; or the principles and rules of style ...

Samuel Phillips Newman - English language - 1837 - 292 pages
...have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation : he was naturally learned ; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature; he looked...I cannot say he is every where alike ; were he so, 1 should do him injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind. He is many times flat, insipid...
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Complete Works: With Dr. Johnson's Preface, a Glossary, and an Account of ...

William Shakespeare - 1838 - 926 pages
...have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation ; he was naturally learned ; he needed not and gnarled oak, Tnaa the soft myrtle ; — But man,...he' s most assur'd, His glassy essence, — like an He is many times flat Perhaps I may not be more censured for doing and insipid ; his comic wit degenerating...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1839
...commendation; he was naturally learned; he needed not the spectacles of book^ fo' reacT"nature ; he lflok_ed inwards, and found her there. I cannot say he is every...injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind. He is many times flat and insipid ; his comic wit degenerating into clenches, his serious swelling...
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The Gentleman's Magazine, Volume 169

Early English newspapers - 1840
...and its close pathetic." t When Dryden says, " That Shakspere was naturally learned, and needed not the spectacles of books to read nature — he looked inwards, and found her there !" we must consider this as one of those panegyrical sentences that are not very satisfactory when...
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-III

William Shakespeare - 1841
...naturally learned ; Le needed not the spectacles of hooks to read Nature ; he looked inwards, anil found her there. I cannot say he is every where alike...injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind. He is many times flat and insipid ; his comic wit degenerating into clenches, bis serious swelling...
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