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" All the images of Nature were still present to him, and he drew them, not laboriously, but luckily ; when he describes anything, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation: he... "
The anniversary calendar, natal book, and universal mirror - Page 734
by Anniversary calendar - 1832
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A Manual of Essays: Selected from Various Authors

Manual - Essays - 1809
...him of wanting learning, give him the greater commendation : he was naturally learned, he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature, he looked...injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind. He is many times flat, insipid : his comic wit degenerating into clenches, his serious swelling into...
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The Works of Samuel Johnson, L. L. D.: In Twelve Volumes, Volume 2

Samuel Johnson - 1809
...give him the greater commendation ; he was naturally learned ; he needed not the spectacles of booka to read nature ; he looked inwards, and found her...I cannot say he is every where alike ; were he so T should do him injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind. He is many times flat and insipid...
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The Eclectic review. vol. 1-New [8th], Volume 5, Part 1

1809
...have "wanted learning, give him the greater commendation : he was naturally learned ; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature ; he looked inwards, and found her there. 1 cannot say he is every where alike ; were he so, I should do him injury to compare him with the greatest...
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The Works of William Shakespeare, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1810
...learning, give him the greater commendation : he was naturally learned: he needed not the sfiectacles of books to read nature •; he looked inwards, and...I cannot say he is every where alike ; were he so, J should do him injury to comfiare him with the greatest of mankind. He is many times fiat and insifiid...
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Historical and critical matter The tempest. Two gentlemen of Verona. Merry ...

William Shakespeare - 1811
...have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation ; he was naturally learned ; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature ; he looked...injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind. He is many times flat and insipid ; his ccmick wit degenerating into clenches, his serious swelling...
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Lectures on rhetoric and belles lettres, Volume 3

Hugh Blair - 1811
...was natur" ally learned. He needed not the spectacles of books to read " nature. He looked inward, and found her there. I cannot " say he is every where alike. Were he so, I should do him in" jury to compare him to the greatest of mankind. He is many " times flat and insipid; his comic...
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The Reflector: A Quarterly Magazine, on Subjects of Philosophy ..., Volume 2

Leigh Hunt - English literature - 1811 - 503 pages
...ridiculous squabbles about his learning have had their day ; — " He needed nnt," as Drydcu says, " the spectacles of books to read nature : he looked inwards, and found her there." — It is much more probable, that his own feelings si!ij,r.'fi'ii to him the best consolation the...
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The Works of William Shakespeare: In Nine Volumes, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1810
...have •wanted learning, give him the greater commendation .* he was naturally learned : he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature ; he looked...injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind, he is many times fiat and insipid ; his comick wit degenerating into clenches, his serious swelling...
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The Flowers of Modern History: Comprehending on a New Plan, the Most ...

John Adams - Great Britain - 1813 - 310 pages
...He was naturally learnecf. He needed not the spectacles of Books to read Nature. He looked inward, and found her there. I cannot say he is every where...Were he so, I should do him injury, to compare him to the greatest of mankind. He is many tir-ies flat and insipid ; his comic wit degenerating into clenches...
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General Biography: Or, Lives, Critical and Historical, of the Most ..., Volume 9

John Aikin - Biography - 1814
...laboriously, but luckily. When he describes any thing, you more than see it, you feel it too. He needed not the spectacles of books to read nature ; he looked...injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind. He is many times flat and insipid ; his comic wit degenerating into clenches, his serious swelling...
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