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" All the images of Nature were still present to him, and he drew them, not laboriously, but luckily ; when he describes anything, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation: he... "
The anniversary calendar, natal book, and universal mirror - Page 734
by Anniversary calendar - 1832
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Collected Works Of Samuel Alexander

Samuel Alexander - Philosophy - 2000 - 1988 pages
...him to have wanted learning give him the great commendation. He was naturally learned; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature; he looked inwards, and found her there.1 1 cannot say he is everywhere alike; were he so I should do him an injury to compare him with...
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The Making of the English Literary Canon: From the Middle Ages to the Late ...

Trevor Ross, Trevor Thornton Ross - Literary Criticism - 2000 - 400 pages
...Rigid Criticks" (Spectator 592). In Dryden's celebrated version, Shakespeare "needed not the spectacle of books to read nature; he looked inwards, and found her there" (1:67). The rules were perhaps the last significant expression of a rhetorical will to harmonize the...
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Shakespeare and the Poets' War

James Bednarz - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 266 pages
...learning," Dryden says, "give him the greater commendation. He was naturally learned; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature. He looked inwards and found her there." 60 One of the most vehement defenses of Shakespeare by a contemporary is Leonard Digges's opening elegy...
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The Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare

Ed. de Grazia - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 328 pages
...to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation: he was naturally learned; he needed not the spectacles of books to read Nature; he looked inwards, and found her there. Thus Dryden continued and elaborated the commonplace of Shakespeare as child of nature, and in his...
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Restoration Literature: An Anthology

Paul Hammond - Literary Collections - 2002 - 437 pages
...to have wanted learning* give him the greater commendation: he was naturally learned; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature; he looked inwards, and found her there. I cannot say he is everywhere alike; were he so, I should do him injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind. He...
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Shakespeare Survey, Volume 3

Allardyce Nicoll - Drama - 2002 - 184 pages
...fact remains that what he read he read for the most part in English. Dryden said that "he needed not the spectacles of books to read Nature; he looked inwards and found her there". We shall do well to remember the context in which these words are placed. Dryden, himself a scholar-poet,...
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The Major Works

John Dryden - Literary Criticism - 2003 - 967 pages
...to have wanted learning give him the greater commendation. He was naturally learned. He needed not the spectacles of books to read nature. He looked inwards, and found her there. 'I cannot say he is everywhere alike. Were he so, I should do him injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind. He...
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The Cambridge Shakespeare Library: Shakespeare's times, texts, and stages

Catherine M. S. Alexander - Drama - 2003 - 3 pages
...fact remains that what he read he read for the most part in English. Dryden said that "he needed not the spectacles of books to read Nature; he looked inwards and found her there". We shall do well to remember the context in which these words are placed. Dryden, himself a scholar-poet,...
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Northrop Frye's Notebooks on Renaissance Literature

Northrop Frye - Literary Collections - 2006 - 494 pages
...to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation: he was naturally learned; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature; he looked inwards, and found her there. I cannot say he is everywhere alike; were he so, I should do him injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind. He...
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The Politically Incorrect Guide to English and American Literature

Elizabeth Kantor - Literary Criticism - 2006 - 278 pages
...of his lines" (First Folio). Dryden says in his Essay of Dramatic Poesy that Shakespeare "needed not the spectacles of books to read nature. He looked inwards, and found her there." According to Alexander Pope's preface to his Shakespeare edition, "Homer himself drew not his art so...
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