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" All sadness but despair : now gentle gales, Fanning their odoriferous wings, dispense Native perfumes, and whisper whence they stole Those balmy spoils. "
A System of English Grammar - Page 167
by Charles Walker Connon - 1845 - 168 pages
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British Encyclopedia: Or, Dictionary of Arts and Sciences ..., Volume 10

William Nicholson - Natural history - 1821
...are introduced as living and rational beings; as the following verses of Milton : Now gentle gales, Fanning their odoriferous wings, dispense Native perfumes...and whisper whence they stole Those balmy spoils. The second part of this figure is when we give a voice to inanimate things, and make rocks, woods,...
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Select Works of the British Poets: With Biographical and Critical ..., Volume 1

John Aikin - English poetry - 1820 - 807 pages
...the heart inspires Vernal delight and joy, able to drive All sadness but despair : now gentle gales, p from Susan's eye." The boatswain gave the dreadful Moiambic, off at sea north-east winds blow Sabean odours from the spicy shore Of Araby die blest ;...
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Paradise Lost: A Poem, in Twelve Books

John Milton - Fall of man - 1820 - 305 pages
...joy, able to drive 155 All sadness but despair ; now gentle gales, Fanning their odoriferous wines, dispense Native perfumes, and whisper whence they...who sail Beyond the Cape of Hope, and now are past 160 Mozacobic, off at sea north-east winds blow Sabean odours from the spicy shore Of Arab) the blest...
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Essays and The Bee, Volumes 1-2

Oliver Goldsmith - English essays - 1820
...him, backwards shrunk appalTd. Even Milton has indulged himself in the same licence of expression — -—As when to them who sail Beyond the Cape of Hope, and now are past Mozauibic. off at sta north-east winds blow Satevau odour from the spicy shore Of Araby the biess'ii...
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The Indicator, Volume 1

Leigh Hunt - 1820
...birds are the animal spirits of nature, carolling in the air, like a careless lass. The gentle gales, Fanning their odoriferous wings, dispense Native perfumes;...and whisper whence they stole Those balmy spoils. PARADISE LOST, B. 4. * If the reader wishes to indulge himself in a volume full of sheer poetry with...
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Paradise Lost: A Poem, Volume 1

John Milton - Bible - 1821
...the heart inspires Vernal delight and joy, able to drive All sadness but despair: Now gentle gales, Fanning their odoriferous wings, dispense Native perfumes,...them who sail Beyond the Cape of Hope, and now are pass'd Mozambic, off at sea north-east winds blow Sabean odours from the spicy shore Of Araby the bless'd...
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Paradise lost, a poem

John Milton - 1821
...Vernal delight and joy, able to drive 156 All sadness but despair; now gentle gales, Fanning then- odoriferous wings, dispense .Native perfumes, and...who sail Beyond the Cape of Hope, and now are past 160 Mozamhic, off at sea north-east winds blow Sabean odours from the spicy shore Of Araby the blest;...
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The Plays and Poems of William Shakspeare: With the Corrections ..., Volume 11

William Shakespeare - 1821
...in his Paradise Lost, b. iv. has very successfully introduced the same image : " now gentle gales, " Fanning their odoriferous wings, dispense " Native...and whisper whence they stole " Those balmy spoils." STEEVENS. " That strain again ; — it had a dying fall." Hence Pope, in his Ode on Saint Cecilia's...
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The British Prose Writers: Goldsmith's Essay and Bee

British prose literature - 1821
...him, backwards shrunk anpall'd. Even Milton has indulged himself in the same licence of expression — As when to them who sail Beyond the Cape of Hope, and now are past Mozambic, offat sea north-east winds blow Sabeean odour from the spicy shore Of Araby the blcss'd ;...
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The Elements of English Composition: Serving as a Sequel to the Study of Grammar

David Irving - English language - 1821 - 318 pages
...the blast.— Ostitn. We naturally communicate our joy in the same manner. •' ' . .'' 'A • ' • As when to them who sail Beyond the Cape of Hope, and now are put Mozambic, off at sea north.cast winds blow Sabean odour from the spicy shore ...... Of Araby the...
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