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" The fear of every man that heard him was lest he should make an end. "
The anniversary calendar, natal book, and universal mirror - Page 48
by Anniversary calendar - 1832
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Cyclopaedia of American Literature: Embracing Personal and ..., Volume 1

Evert Augustus Duyckinck, George Long Duyckinck - American literature - 1856 - 694 pages
...neatly, more prestly , more weightily, or sutfcred less emptiness, less idleness in what he uttered. No member of his speech but consisted of his own graces....commanded where he spoke ; and had his judges angry or pleased at his devotion. The fear of every one that heard him -was, lest he should make an end."...
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Half-hours with the best authors, selected by C. Knight, Volume 1

Half hours - 1856
...neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness, in what he uttered. No member of his speech, but consisted of his own...look aside from him, without loss. He commanded where ho spoke ; and had his judges augry a; n I pleased at his devotion. No man had their affections more...
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Essays, Critical and Miscellaneous

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - English essays - 1856 - 744 pages
...his own graces. His hearers could not cough or look uside from him without loss. He commanded -here he spoke, and had his judges angry and pleased at his devotion. No man had fheir afl'ections more in his power. The fear of every man that heard him was lest he should make an...
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Compendium of English Literature: Chronologically Arranged, from Sir John ...

Charles Dexter Cleveland - English literature - 1848 - 776 pages
...neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness, in what he uttered. No member of his speech but consisted of his own graces....man that heard him was, lest he should make an end. \flr .-lltli'nii r*f L1L- ,1,,,-L-fi . *.**. iv.nvnnnn/1 *~.. .....i 1.1.,. k. UI „...
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Some Makers of English Law

Sir William Searle Holdsworth - Law - 1938 - 308 pages
...have Bacon. Ben Jonson's testimony of Bacon's eloquence as an advocate is decisive. Ben Jonson said,1 "His hearers could not cough or look aside from him without loss. He commanded when he spoke, and had his judges angry and pleased at his devotion. The fear of every man that heard...
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The Greatest of Literary Problems: The Authorship of the Shakespeare Works ...

James Phinney Baxter - Drama - 1915 - 685 pages
...more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, suffered less emptiness, less idleness, in what he uttered. No member of his speech but consisted of his own graces. His hearers could not cough, nor look aside from him, without loss. He commanded when he spoke, and had his judges angry and pleased...
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Ralph Waldo Emerson, His Life, Genius, and Writings: A Biographical Sketch ...

Alexander Ireland - Authors, American - 1882 - 338 pages
...neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness, in what he uttered. No member of his speech but consisted of his own graces....him, without loss. He commanded where he spoke.'" Mr. Lowell gives a vivid description of the effect produced by Emerson's speech at the Burns Centenary...
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Francis Bacon: Discovery and the Art of Discourse

Lisa Jardine, Professor of Renaissance Studies Lisa Jardine - Science - 1974 - 267 pages
...sustained attention. Ben Jonson paid tribute to these powers of presentation in Bacon's public speeches: 'His hearers could not cough, or look aside from him,...devotion. No man had their affections more in his power' [I, 13-14]. 16 Dialectic and method in the sixteenth century The development of dialectic in the sixteenth...
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The Story of Philosophy

Will Durant - Biography & Autobiography - 1961 - 543 pages
...suffered less emptiness, less idleness in what he uttered. No member of his speech but consisted of its own graces. His hearers could not cough or look aside...from him without loss. He commanded where he spoke. . . . No man had their affections more in his power. The fear of every man that heard him was lest...
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Francis Bacon: The Temper of a Man

Catherine Drinker Bowen - Biography & Autobiography - 1993 - 245 pages
...at his best. When he rose to speak, the crowded benches were quiet. We have Ben Jonson's testimony: "The fear of every man that heard him was, lest he should make an end." The light quick voice was no longer hurried; a speaker can learn the tricks of good delivery. The lines...
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