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" The fear of every man that heard him was lest he should make an end. "
The anniversary calendar, natal book, and universal mirror - Page 48
by Anniversary calendar - 1832
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Critical and Miscellaneous Essays, Volume 2

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - English essays - 1840
...neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness, in what he uttered. No member of his speech but consisted of his own graces....man that heard him was lest he should make an end.' From the mention which is made of judges, it would seem that Jonson had heard Bacon only at the bar....
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The American Phrenological Journal and Miscellany, Volume 3

Phrenology - 1841
...suffered less emptiness, less idleness in what he uttered; no member of his speech but consisted of its own graces; his hearers could not cough or look aside from him without loss. He commanded when he spoke; and his judges were pleased or angry at his devotion. No man had their affections more...
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Works, Volume 2

Francis Bacon - 1841
...consisted of hie own graces. Ills hearerscould not cough, or look aside from him without lose, lie commanded where he spoke ; and had his judges angry and pleased at his devotion. No man bad their affections more in his power. The fear of every man that heard him was lest he should make...
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The Phrenological Journal and Science of Health, Volume 3

1841
...suffered less emptiness, less idleness in what he uttered ; no member of his speech but consisted of its own graces ; his hearers could not cough or look aside from him without loss. He commanded when he spoke ; and his judges were pleased or angry at his devotion. No man had their affections more...
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The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England, Volume 2

Francis Bacon - 1841
...neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness, in what he uttered. No member of his speech but consisted of his own graces. His hearcrscould not cough, or look aside from him without loss. He commanded where he spoke ; and had...
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Principles of Eloquence

John Siffrein Maury - 1842
...member of his speech but consisted of its own graces. His hearers couldnot cough or look aside from Mm without loss. He commanded where he spoke, and had his judges angry y and pleased at his devotion. The fear of every man - that heard him was, that he should make an end."*...
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Critical and Historical Essays Contributed to the Edinburgh Review, Volume 2

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - English literature - 1843
...neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness, in what he uttered. No member of his speech but consisted of his own graces....man that heard him was lest he should make an end." From the mention which is made of judges, it would seem that Jonson had heard Bacon only at the bar....
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The Eclectic Magazine of Foreign Literature, Science, and Art, Volume 34

1855
...neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, leas idleness, in what he uttered. No member of his speech, but consisted of his own...affections more in his power. The fear of every man who heard him was lest he should make an end." In politics, however, he made a perilous attempt to...
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The Eclectic Magazine of Foreign Literature, Science, and Art, Volume 18

American literature - 1849
...neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness, in what he uttered. No member of his speech but consisted of his own graces....angry and pleased at his devotion. No man had their afl'ections more in his power. The fear of every man that heard him was, lest he should make an end."f...
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The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England, Volume 2

Francis Bacon, Basil Montagu - 1844
...consisted of his own graces. Ilia hearerscould not cough, or look aside from him without loss. lie commanded where he spoke ; and had his judges angry...man that heard him was lest he should make an end. 3 Tafcf for instance any of the Nervom Aphorisms, in the Novum Organum, and compare it with the sentences...
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