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" Would you know the sentiments, inclinations, and course of life of the Greeks and Romans ? Study well the temper and actions of the French and English. "
A Philosophical and Practical Treatise on the Will: Forming the Third Volume ... - Page 187
by Thomas Cogswell Upham - 1843 - 411 pages
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Freedom and Moral Sentiment: Hume's Way of Naturalizing Responsibility

Paul Russell - Philosophy - 2002 - 216 pages
...education (T, 401-3; EU, 83-88; see esp. EU, 85-86: "Are the manners ..."). Hume observes that although "mankind are so much the same, in all times and places,...informs us of nothing new or strange in this particular" (EU, 83), we must, nevertheless, be alive to the varied and complex influences at work in this sphere....
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David Hume: Critical Assessments, Volume 5

Stanley Tweyman - 1995 - 512 pages
...ages, and that human nature remains still the same, in its principles and operations . . . Mankind is so much the same, in all times and places, that history informs us of nothing new and strange in this particular. Its chief use is only to discover the constant and universal principles...
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Reason in Action: Essays in the Philosophy of Social Science

Martin Hollis - Philosophy - 1996 - 283 pages
...source of all actions and enterprises, which have ever been observed among mankind. Would you know the sentiments, inclinations and course of life of...informs us of nothing new or strange in this particular. (Enquiries, VIII. 1. 65) The real Humean reason that history has no news for us is not, I think, that...
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The Boundaries of Fiction: History and the Eighteenth-century British Novel

Everett Zimmerman - Literary Criticism - 1996 - 250 pages
...and that human nature remains still the same, in its principles and operations. . . . Would you know the sentiments, inclinations, and course of life of...Study well the temper and actions of the French and English."14 Consequently to "explode any forgery in history, we cannot make use of a more convincing...
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The Enlightenment: An Interpretation. The science of freedom

Peter Gay - Philosophy - 1996 - 705 pages
...the source of all the actions and enterprizes, which have ever been observed among mankind." Indeed, "Mankind are so much the same, in all times and places,...history informs us of nothing new or strange in this particular."5 At the same time, Hume wondered at the display of human variety: "Mighty revolutions...
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A History of Western Political Thought

J. S. McClelland, Mc Clelland J S - Philosophy - 1996 - 810 pages
...out what human nature in its natural state is really like? All enlightened thinkers could agree that 'mankind are so much the same, in all times and places, that historv informs us of nothing new in this particular' fthe expression is Hume'sf, hut the prohlem was...
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Religion and Faction in Hume's Moral Philosophy

Jennifer A. Herdt - Philosophy - 1997 - 300 pages
...and that human nature remains still the same, in its principles and operations . . . Would you know the sentiments, inclinations, and course of life of...observations which you have made with regard to the latter" (E 83; emphasis in original). On the next (and less-cited) page, which is reminiscent of Hume's discussion...
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Cognition and Commitment in Hume's Philosophy

Don Garrett Associate Professor of Philosophy University of Utah - Philosophy - 1996 - 288 pages
...nations and ages, and that human nature remains still the same, in its principles and operations. 4. Mankind are so much the same, in all times and places,...informs us of nothing new or strange in this particular. 5. [I]f we would explode any forgery in history, we cannot make use of a more convincing argument,...
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Trust Within Reason

Martin Hollis, Professor of Philosophy Martin Hollis - Philosophy - 1998 - 170 pages
...the source of all actions and enterprises, which have ever been observed amongmankind. Would you know the sentiments, inclinations and course of life of...history informs us of nothing new or strange in this particular.2 He thus commits himself squarely to a human nature which is constant in its principles...
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Gender, Genre, and Victorian Historical Writing

Rohan Amanda Maitzen - Social Science - 1998 - 229 pages
...priorities — is uniform and unchanging. The classic statement of this belief is Hume's: Would you know the sentiments, inclinations, and course of life of...to the latter. Mankind are so much the same, in all iimes and places, that history informs us of nothing new or strange in this particular. Its chief use...
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