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" midst falling dew, While glow the heavens with the last steps of day, Far, through their rosy depths, dost thou pursue Thy solitary way ? Vainly the fowler's eye Might mark thy distant flight to do thee wrong, As, darkly painted on the crimson sky, Thy... "
Spirit of the English Magazines - Page 319
1822
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The American Quarterly Observer, Volume 1

Bela Bates Edwards - Theology - 1833
...rapidity of the first. How perfectly and inimitably descriptive are the last two of the following lines. " Vainly the fowler's eye Might mark thy distant flight to do thee wrong As, darkly painted on the crimson sky, Thy figure floats along." The extracts we have made give,...
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The English Annual for ...

1837
...subject. " Whither, midst falling dew, While glow the heavens with the last step of day, Far, through their rosy depths, dost thou pursue Thy solitary way...fowler's eye Might mark thy distant flight to do thee wrong, As, darkly painted on the crimson sky, Thy figure floats along. Seek'st thou the plashy brink...
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Selections from the American Poets: With Some Introductory Remarks

American poetry - 1834 - 357 pages
...one who wraps the drapery of his couch About him, and lies down to pleasant dreams. TO A WATERFOWL. WHITHER, 'midst falling dew, While glow the heavens with the last steps of day, Far, through their rosy depths, dost thou pursue Thy solitary way ? Vainly the fowler's eye Might mark thy...
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The History of Wisbech: With an Historical Sketch of the Fens

Fens, The (England) - 1834 - 314 pages
...desert walks the lapwing flies, And tires its echos with unvaried cries. Goldsmith. TO A WATER FOWL.* Whither, 'midst falling dew, While glow the heavens with the last steps of day, Far, through their rosy depths, dost thou pursue Thy solitary way. Vainly the fowler's eye Might mark thy...
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Selections from the American Poets: With Some Introductory Remarks

American poetry - 1834 - 357 pages
...wraps the drapery of his eoueh About him, and lies down to pleasant dreams. TO A WATERFOWL. WHTTHEB, 'midst falling dew, While glow the heavens with the last steps of day, Far, through their rosy depths, dost thou pursue Thy solitary way ? Vainly the fowler's eye Might mark thy...
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The American First Class Book: Or, Exercises in Reading and Recitation ...

John Pierpont - 1835
...BRYANT. WHITHER, 'midst falling dew, While glow the heavens with the last steps of day, Far, through their rosy depths, dost thou pursue Thy solitary way...fowler's eye Might mark thy distant flight to do thee wrong, As, darkly painted on the crimson sky, Thy figure floats along. . Seek'st thou the plashy brink...
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An Introduction to the Study of Birds: Or, the Elements of Ornithology on ...

Birds - 1835 - 584 pages
...American poet, are so much to the purpose that they need no excuse for their insertion. TO A WATERFOWL. WHITHER 'midst falling dew, While glow the heavens with the last steps of day, Far through their rosy depths dost thou pursue Thy solitary way 1 Vainly the fowler's eye Might mark thy...
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The Eclectic review. vol. 1-New [8th]

1835
...cannot refrain from extracting it as a second specimen of this favourite poet. ' To A WATERFOWL. ' Whither, 'midst falling dew, While glow the heavens with the last steps of day, Far, through their rosy depths, dost thou pursue The solitary way ? ' Seek'st thou the plashy brink Of weedy...
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The Every-day Book and Table Book: Or, Everlasting Calandar of Popular ...

William Hone - Days - 1835
...distinctly for a considerable time along the Hammersmith-road. The shadows of evening were lengthening, and midst falling dew, While glow the Heavens with the last steps of day, Far through their rosy depths it did pursue Its solitary way."* SPITAL SERMONS. In London, on Easter Monday...
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The American First Class Book: Or, Exercises in Reading and Recitation ...

John Pierpont - Readers - 1835 - 480 pages
...friendly words ; — but knew not what they were. LESSON CXIV. To a Waterfowl. — BRYANT. WHITHEK, 'midst falling dew, While glow the heavens with the last steps of day, Far, through their rosy depths, dost thou pursue Thy solitary way ? Vainly the fowler's eye Might mark thy...
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