Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" Lear. What, art mad ? A man may see how this world goes with no eyes. Look with thine ears : see how yond justice rails upon yond simple thief. Hark, in thine ear: change places; and, handy-dandy, which is the justice, which is the thief? "
Proceedings of the ... Annual Meeting of the Alabama State Bar Association - Page 96
by Alabama State Bar Association - 1922
Full view - About this book

Trade Secrets

John Douglas - Fiction - 2000 - 252 pages
[ Sorry, this page's content is restricted ]
No preview available - About this book

The Plays of Shakespeare: A Thematic Guide

Victor L. Cahn - Drama - 2001 - 361 pages
...Bedlam. As Lear and Gloucester hold onto each other for support, Lear reflects bitterly: What, art mad? A man may see how this world goes with no eyes. Look...handy-dandy, which is the justice, which is the thief? (IV, vi, 150-154) He then offers a litany of corruptions in which the powerful are as guilty as those...
Limited preview - About this book

King Lear: A Guide to the Play

Jay L. Halio - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 128 pages
...of. His sense in nonsense appears again when he addresses Gloucester on Dover Beach: What, art mad? A man may see how this world goes with no eyes; look...simple thief. Hark, in thine ear: change places, and handy dandy, which is the justice, which is the thief? (4.5.144-47) Edgar's comment a few lines later...
Limited preview - About this book

Experimental Sound and Radio

Allen S. Weiss - Performing Arts - 2001 - 188 pages
...Semiotics Mary Louise Hill LEAR: Wliat, art mad? A man may see how this world goes uHth no eyes. Look until thine ears. See how yond justice rails upon yond simple...handy-dandy, which is the justice, which is the thief? (IVilliam Shakespeare, King Lear 4.6, lines 150—54) When I was originally faced with those basic...
Limited preview - About this book

Vagrancy, Homelessness, and English Renaissance Literature

Linda Woodbridge - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 338 pages
...inequities reproduce economic disparities: the law favors the rich and oppresses the poor. He declares, "See how yond justice rails upon yond simple thief....handy-dandy, which is the justice, which is the thief?" (4.6.151-54). Gaining intensity as he thinks about it, Lear shifts from hard-hitting prose into memorable...
Limited preview - About this book

King Lear

William Shakespeare - Fathers and daughters - 2001 - 500 pages
...this, /. e. none at all) as being the true text. Glou. I see it feelingly. 147 Lear. What, art mad ? A man may see how this world goes with no eyes. Look with thine ears ; see, how yond justice fails upon yond simple thief. Hark, in, thine ear; 150 change places, and, handy-dandy, which is the...
Limited preview - About this book

King Lear, by William Shakespeare

Lloyd Cameron - English literature - 2001 - 102 pages
...the blind Gloucester, he rages against the injustice of society: See, how yon justice rails upon yon simple thief. Hark in thine ear: change places and...handy-dandy, which is the justice, which is the thief? (Act IV, Sc. vi, lines 145-147) However, Gloucester's trial ends with Cornwall's death at the hands...
Limited preview - About this book

Say It Like Shakespeare: How to Give a Speech Like Hamlet, Persuade Like ...

Thomas Leech - Business & Economics - 2001 - 313 pages
...quills, his cases, his tenures, and his tricks? Hamlet, Hamlet. 5, 1 See how yon justice rails upon yon simple thief. Hark in thine ear: change places and...handy-dandy, which is the justice, which is the thief? Lear, King Lear. 4, 6 The jury, passing on the prisoner's life May in the sworn twelve have a thief...
Limited preview - About this book

Symplectic Geometry and Mirror Symmetry: Proceedings of the 4th KIAS Annual ...

Kodŭng Kwahagwŏn (Korea). International Conference, Kenji Fukaya - Mirror symmetry - 2001 - 498 pages
...purse in a light: yet you see how this world goes. Glouc: I see it feelingly. Lear: What! art mad? A man may see how this world goes with no eyes. Look with thine ears ... (4.6.137-49) Read- something else, not that our eyes do, but that we ourselves do by means of the...
Limited preview - About this book

Shakespeare's Noise

Kenneth Gross - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 282 pages
...intelligence, no sex, but all the same a body, a little bit of flesh. Because for Lear, to hear is to see: "A man may see how this world goes with no eyes . . . look with thine ears." This is what he tries to do, the king who calls himself Lear, ear, in listening to his daughters: he...
Limited preview - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF