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Cratæ gus Oxyacántha, et var. The common Hawthorn, and Five of its

Varieties.
Leaves and fruit of the natural size.

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C. 0. Olivier na.

3 m 2

eriocarpa

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Cratæ gus Oxyacantha var. Five Varieties of the Hawthorn.

Leaves and fruit of the natural size.

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C. 0. máltiplex.

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c. 0. růsea.

Cratæ'gus parvifolia, C. p. flórida, C. p.grossulariæfolia, C. virginica,

C. mexicàna. The small-leaved Thorn, the Florida Thorn, the Gooseberry-leaved Thorn, the Virginian Thorn, and the Mexican Thorn.

Leaves and fruit of the natural size.

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GENUS XIV.

p. 602.

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PHOTI'NIA Lindl. THE PHOTINIA. Lin. Syst. Icosandria Di-Pentagynia.
Identification. Lindl. in Lin. Soc. Trans., 13. p. 103. ; Dec. Prod., 2. p. 631. ; Don's Mill., 2. p. 602.
Synonyme. Cratæ'gus sp. L.
Derivation. From photcinos, shining; in allusion to the lucid surface of the leaves.

Description, &c. Evergreen trees, with undivided, coriaceous, serrated, or entire, leaves. Flowers, in most, in terminal corymbose panicles; and small fruit, at least which has appeared small, as far as it has been seen in an unripe state. (Dec. Prod., ii. p. 631.) The garden treatment of this genus is exactly the same as that of Cratægus, except that the species are somewhat more tender. They are eminently ornamental.

1 1. P. SERRULA'TA Lindl. The serrulated-leaved Photinia. Identification. Lindi, in Lin. Soc. Trans., 13. p. 103. ; Dec. Prod., 9. p. 631. ; and Don's Mill., 2. Synonyme. Cratæ'gus glabra Thunb. Fl. Jap., 205., Bot. Mag., Lodd. Bot. Cab., Colla Hort. Ripul. Engravings. Bot. Mag., t. 2105.; Bot. Cab., t. 248. ; Colla Hort. Ripul., t. 36.; and the plate of the

species in our Second Volume. Spec. Char., &c. Leaves oblong, acute, serrulated. Pedicels longer than the

calyx. Buds large, red. (Dec. Prod., ii. p. 631.) A native of Japan and China ; introduced in 1801, and forming a very handsome, evergreen, low tree. It is commonly grafted or budded on thorn stocks; and it also does well upon quince stocks. . In the neighbourhood of London, it flowers between the middle of April and the middle of May ; but it has not yet produced fruit in England. The largest and oldest plants are at White Knights, where it was planted in 1804; and, in 1835, formed a large bush, or tree, nearly 15 ft. high. In Essex, at Highlands, 8 years planted, it is 12 ft. high. In Hertfordshire, at Cheshunt, 6 years planted, it is 10 ft. high.

6 In Pembrokeshire, at Golden Grove, 30 years planted, it is 12 ft. high. In Devonshire, at Killerton, 8 years planted, it is 10 ft. high ; at Luscombe, 8 years planted, and 16 ft. high, with a head 14 ft. in diameter. In Hampshire, at Leigh Park, 7 years planted, it is 11 ft. high. In Scotland, in Argyllshire, at Toward Castle, 6 years planted, it is 7 ft. high. In Ireland, in Cork, at Castle Freke, it is 8ft high. The largest plants, as standards, in the neighbourhood of London, are at Syon, where, in 8 years, it has attained the height of from 12 ft. to 15 ft., Alowering occasionally. In the Botanic Garden at Kew, and in the Horticultural Society's Garden, there are trees against walls which flower freely every year. In the neighbourhood of Paris, Photínia serrulàta is found quite hardy, and it retains the greater part of its leaves during winter. In 1829, there were numerous trees of it at Coomb-la-Ville. În Britain, in situations too cold for planting this tree as a standard, it well deserves a place against a wall, for its large, deep green, shining leaves, which, when they appear in spring, are of a dark brownish red; while those of the preceding year, when they drop off, which is for the most part in May, are of an intensely deep red, or scarlet. Fit associates for it against a wall are, P. arbutifòlia, Cratæ gus glaúca, C. mexicana, Raphiolepis indica, and Eriobótrya japónica. Price of plants, in the London nurseries, 1s. 6d. each; at Paris, 1 franc; at Bollwyller, 2 francs; and at New York, ?.

1 2. P. ARBUTIFO‘lia Lindl. The Arbutus-leaved Photinia. Identification. Lindl. in Lin. Soc. Trans., 13. p. 103. ; Dec. Prod., 2. p. 631. ; Don's Mill., 2. p. 602. Synonyme. Cratæ'gus arbutifolia Ait. Hort. Kow., ed. 2. vol. 3. Engravings. Bot. Reg. t. 491. ; and our fig. 619. Spec. Char., fc. Leaves with the disk oblong-lanceolate, acute, distantly

serrated, six times longer than the petiole, which is red. The panicle, in this species, is not corymbose. (Dec. Prod., ii. p. 631.) A native of Cali

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fornia; introduced in 1796, but hitherto little cultivated. In its native country, it forms a tree from 10 ft. to 20 ft. high ; but in England it has scarcely been tried as a standard, though there can be no doubt that it is as hardy as, or hardier than, P. serrulàta. Against a wall

, it has flowered in the Horticultural Society's Garden, in July and August. It may be propagated with the greatest facility by budding it on the common hawthorn; and, in the colder parts of England, would be valuable as an evergreen for a wall. Plants, in the London nurseries, are 28. 6d. each. In the Fulham Nursery is a variety known there as P. a. serótina.

1 3. P. INTEGRIFO'lia Lindl. The entire-leaved Photinia. Identification. Lindl. in Lin. Trans., 13. p. 103. ; Don's Mill., 2. p. 602. Synonymes. Pỹrus integérrima Wall. ex D. Don Prod. Fl. Nep., p. 237. Spec. Char., 8c. Leaves elliptic, acuminated, quite entire. Panicle diffuse.

Pedicels bractless. Ovary 3-celled ; cells biovulate. (Don's Mill., ii. p. 602.) A tree, growing to the height of 20 ft., a native of Nepal ; introduced in 1820.

1 4. P. DU'bia Lindl. The doubtful Photinia. Identification. Lindl. in Lin. Trans., 13. p. 104.; Don's Mill., 2. p. 602. Synonymes. Méspilus bengalensis Rozb.; M. tinctdria D. Don. Prod. Fl. Nep., 238. ; Cratæ gus Engraving. Lin. Trans. 13. t. 10. Spec. Char, 8c. Leaves lanceolate, distantly serrated. Panicle corymbose,

pilose. Fruit 2-celled. Seed 1, large, and clothed with a loose testa. Fruit sometimes 1-celled from abortion, and 2-seeded. (Don's Mill., ii

. p. 602.) A tree, 20 ft. high, a native of Nepal ; introduced in 1821. It appears nearly allied to Raphiolepis. Hamilton states that the bark is used, in Nepal, to dye cotton red.

App. i. Species of Photinia not yet introduced. P. bengalensis Wall, is a native of Bengal; and is, doubtless, rather tender. P. Sieboldii Don's Mill., 2. p. 602.; Méspilus Sieboldii Blum. Bidjr., 1102.; is a native of China.

P. læ'vis Dec. Prod., 2. p. 631. ; Cratæ'gus læ'vis Thunb. Fl. Jap., 204. ; is a Japan tree, growing to the height of 20 ft.

P. viliosa Dec. Prod., 2. p. 631. ; Cratæ'gus villdsa Thunb. Jap., 204. ; is a native of Japan, with compound umbels, and the fruit villous.

All these sorts appear to be well worth procuring, being apparently all evergreens, with fine large shining leaves.

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Shicola Ham. MSS.

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GENUS XV.

Derivation

COTONEA'STER Med. The COTONEASTER. Lin. Syst. Icosandria

Di-Pentagynia. Identification. Med. Gesch. Bot., 1793. ; Lindl. in Lin. Soc. Trans., 13. p. 101. ; Dec. Prod., 2. p. 632. ;

Don's Mill., 2. p. 603. Synonyme Méspilus sp. Lin.

Cotoneaster, a sort of barbarous word, signifying quince-like. The quince was called Cotonea by Pliny; and aster, a corruption of ad instar, is used occasionally to express similitude. The genus, and C. frigida in particular, is not unlike the quince in its leaves. (Lindley in Bot. Reg., t. 1187. and 1229.)

Description. Small trees of Europe and India. Leaves simple, entire; the lower surface covered with hairs. Flowers in spreading lateral cymes. Petals small, continuing long upon the plant. Bracteas awl-shaped, déciduous. (Lindley in Bot. Reg., t. 1229.) The species are very desirable garden shrubs, or low trees, from the beauty of their foliage, their flowers, and their

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