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HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA,
OFFICE OF THE CHIEF SIGNAL OFFICER,

July 31, 1864–1.55 p. m. Brigadier-General WEITZEL,

Chief of Staff : GENERAL: The signal officer at Spring Hill station reports at 4.30 p. m. that eleven ompty cars just passed the Junction toward Richmond. Very respectfully, &c.,

L. B. NORTON, Captain and Chief Signal Officer.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA,
OFFICE OF THE CHIEF SIGNAL OFFICER,

July 31, 1864. Brigadier-General WEITZEL,

Acting Chief of Staff: GENERAL: The signal officer at Spring Hill reports at 6.45 p. m. that eight cars partly loaded with troops then passed the Junction toward Petersburg. Very respectfully, &c.,

L. B. NORTON, Captain and Chief Signal Officer,

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA,
OFFICE OF THE CHIEF SIGNAL OFFICER,

July 31, 1864. Brigadier-General WEITZEL,

Acting Chief of Staff: GENERAL: The signal officer on the Spring Hill station reports the following trains as having passed the Junction: At 11 p. m. July 30 one toward Richmond; at 11.30 p. m. one toward Petersburg; at 12.30 a. m. to-day one toward Petersburg; at 2.30 a. in. another toward Petersburg; at 2.35 a. m. one toward Richmond; at 3.30 a. m. another toward Richmond. Very respectfully, &c.,

L. B. NORTON, Captain and Chief Signal Officer.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VA, AND N. C.,
No. 208.

In the Field, Va., July 31, 1864.
I. Brig. Gen. H. W. Birge, commanding First Brigade, Second
Division, Nineteenth Army Corps, will immediately proceed, with his
command, to Washington, D. C., and there report for further orders.
Quartermaster's department will furnish transportation.

II. Colonel Molineux, commanding Second Brigade, Second Division, Nineteenth Army Corps, will immediately proceed, with his com. mand, to Washington, D. C., and there report for further orders. Quartermaster's department will furnish transportation,

IX. To promote the efficiency of the signal ceps in this department, Capt. L. B. Norton, chief signal officer, will forward to Major Eckert, assistant superintendent military telegraph, Washington, D. C., the field telegraph trains and instruments. The horses, wagons, and such other quartermaster or ordnance property as may be needed he will retain for the use of the army in the field.

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By command of Major-General Butler:

R. S. DAVIS, Assistant Adjutant General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 31, 1861–1 a, m. Colonel ABBOT:

The siege guns cannot well be sent by artillery teams; they may be wanted at any moment for the field batteries. I have asked Colonel Wainwright and Colonel Monroe to get out all the siege material and park it to await teams. Would it be best to send them to City Point or Broadway Landing! Ask Ingalls for transportation, and if for City Point, whether the railroad could be used to advantage. General Ord has been directed to send such siege artillery as he can spare to City Point. I presume he will provide transportation, but I expect to hear from him on the subject.

II. J. HUNT,

Brigailier-General.

zeneral.

BROADWAY LANDING, VA., July 31, 1864—1.30 a. m. General HUNT,

Headquarters Army of the Potomac: Everything must come here and not to City Point. It will be impossible to load at the latter. Here everything is ready. The railroad cannot be used. I would much prefer to have the direction of the withdrawal without the aid of Colonel Wainwright and Colonel Monroe, as they know nothing of my facilities and would only confuse. So also with General Ord. I can withdraw myself far better than through other agents not under my orders.

HENRY L. ABBOT, Colonel First Connecticut Artillery.

BROADWAY LANDING, VA., July 31, 1861–1.35 a. m. Colonel INGALLS,

Chief Quartermaster in Field, City Point: I am ordered to withdraw large siege material in haste. Please forward if possible eighteen eight-mule teams and sixty wagons with least possible delay to Broadway Landing, and oblige, Yours, &c.,

HENRY L. ABBOT, Colonel First Connecticut Artillery.

ILEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 31, 1861. Colonel ABBOT:

I have telegraphed to General Ingalls for cars to carry seven of your Parrotts, ammunition and detachments, to City Point. Hunt says they go there—the guns and ammunition. I have telegraphed for a locomo tive for the heavy mortar. The Coehorns and siege mortars cannot be sent to-night; time will not allow.

A. PIPER, Colonel Tenth Nero York Artillery, Chief of Artillery.

BROADWAY LANDING, VA., July 31, 1864—2 a. m. Colonel PIPER,

Chief of Artillery, Eighteenth Corps : My guns must come here to be loaded and I suppose the word City Point was used by mistake. If you will have the guns dragged by hand to where I can get teams to them by daylight I can send fir them there then; but, if possible, do please forward them, each drawn by the caisson horses of a light battery, and the ammunition in wagons.

H. L. ABBOT, Colonel First Connecticut Artillery.

BROADWAY LANDING, VA., July 31, 1864—6 a. m. Brigadier-General INGALLS,

Chief Quartermaster Armies in the Field, City Point : Was my telegram asking for more teams and wagons received last night, and can they be sent and how soon,

if so?

HENRY L. ABBOT, Colonel First Connecticut Artillery.

CITY POINT, July 31, 1861. Colonel ABBOT:

Your dispatch was received. - Capt. E. J. Strang has been orilered to send the teams you require at once.

RUFUS INGALLS,

Brigadier General.

HIEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 31, 1861. . Colonel ABBOT:

Colonel Allcock has been directed to attend to the forwarding of the six ('oehorns from Wainwright.

II. J. HUNT,

Chief of Artillery.

BROADWAY LANDING, VA., July 31, 1864—7.15 11. in. Lieutenant-Colonel ALLCOCK:

(Care of General Hunt, headquarters Army of the Potomac.) A train, to remove the guns and ammunition in Fort Hell, will be soon started. Send an officer at once to Captain Brooker, command

ing siege battery near Warren's headquarters, to take charge of the train. Have the guns prepared for moving, and, if possible, send them off before dark. If not, do it as early as possible to-night. I send six eight-mule teams for the guns and eight wagons for the ammunition and implements, supposing that there are about 400 rounds on hand. If more, you must send a wagon from your own train. Send a guard with the guns, &c., to see that they report as soon as possible at Broadway Landing. Do not start without a guide that knows the way.

HENRY L. ABBOT,
Colonel First Connecticut Artillery.

BROADWAY LANDING, VA., July 31, 1864–12.30 a. m.
Captain BROOKER,
First Connecticut Artillery, Commanding Siege Battery,

Near General Warren's Headquarters : (Through Headquarters Fifth Corps.) I start a train of sixty-one wagons to report to you with a letter of instruction. All siege material is to be moved here at once. This train is for the mortar batteries of Pierce and Patterson; your guns and Pratt's will be sent for by General Hunt, so be in readiness for this move.

HENRY L. ABBOT,
Colonel First Connecticut Artillery.

BROADWAY LANDING, VA., July 31, 1864–7.20 11. m. Captain BROOKER,

Commanding Siege Battery near Warren's Headquarters : (Through his Telegraph Operator.) I shall send a large train of about sixty wagons with twelve eightinule teams to report to you, carrying a letter of instructions. They will report in, say, two hours. Have your guns and Captain Pratt's ready to start as soon as possible. Report the condition of progress of the mortar train.

HENRY L. ABBOT,
Colonel First Connecticut Artillery.

BROADWAY LANDING, July 31, 1864. Captain BROOKER,

Commanding Siege Guns, Army of the Potomac: CAPTAIN: I send eighteen eight-mule teams and forty-five wagons. Of these turn over to the officer sent by Colonel Allcock, commanding Fourth New York, now waiting at your headquarters, six of the eightnule teams and eight wagons to remove the guns in Fort Hell, for doing which Colonel Allcock has instructions. The rest of the train is for your command, the estimate as follows: The twelve eight-mule teams for yourself and Captain Pratt; the wagons as follows: Brooker, 9; Pratt, 5; Gillett, 15; total 29. See that the platforms of Pierce, Patterson, and Gillett are brought away. I send eight surplus wag. ons, as the estimate of ammunition on hand may be erroneous, no

reports of tiring yesterday having been received. I want everything that can possibly be started to-day to be hurried here as soon as possible, the rest without fail early to-night. As soon as everything is removed from a battery the company will report here. All guns will be accompanied by a strong detail, with guides familiar with the road. I will send back two mortar wagons for the remaining 10-inch mortars as soon as possible. Advise me by telegraph of anything you may want, and of your progress. See Colonel Wainwright, of Warren's staff, and get the Coehorns it General Hunt has so ordered, six of them with ammunition; it will take, say, six wagons. I sent them to him night before last. Your obedient servant,

HENRY L. ABBOT,

Colonel, Commanding.

BROADWAY LANDING, VA., July 31, 1864—7.30 a. m. General HUNT,

Headquarters Army of the Potomac: Have sent last night about enough wagons to remove the heavy mortars on Warren's front, except two mortars without ammunition, which must wait the return of the mortar wagons. Have another train about starting, of sixty wagons with eighteen mule teams, which will remove all the heavy artillery with Army of the Potomac as soon as it can be loaded. Have received seven Parrott guns and ammunition complete from General Ord. Please notify me whether the six Coehorns sent Colonel Wainwright have been ordered to me.

HENRY L. ABBOT, Colonel First Connecticut Artillery.

MEMORANDUM.—Guns from Fort Hell arrived 8.30 a. m. Colonel White, with twelve teams and forty-five wagons, started for Army of the Potomac 8.45 a, m.

BROADWAY LANDING, VA., July 31, 1864—9 d. . Colonel PIPER,

Chief of Artillery, Eighteenth Corps : The seven Parrotts have arrived safely with their ammunition. I can send any amount of wagons for the rest of the siege material if re: quired. Please notify me what it is contemplated to send to rear. If Dow's guns are coming please send them with light artillery horses if possible; if not, I can supply teams.

HENRY L. ABBOT, Colonel First Connecticut Artillery.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

July 31, 1864. Colonel ABBOT:

The mortars now here are to remain. It is not yet decided whether Dow's guns are to be moved or to remain. It will take about eleven wagons for the ammunition and material for Dow's guns. Can you

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