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THE

MAGAZINE OF POETRY

A QUARTERLY REVIEW

ILLUSTRATED

JULY 1893

CHARLES WELLS MOULTON

BUFFALO NY

CONTENTS FOR JULY, 1893.

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CHARLES DICKENS .

Portrait by D. Maclise, GEORGE ELIOT

With Portrait CHARLES DICKENS FANNY PURDY PALMER

With portrait from Ye Rose Studio, Providence, R. I. GEORGE KLINGLE

With portrait by Fredericks, New York.
WALTER MALONE . .

With portrait by Ben. Bingham, Memphis, Tenn.
EDWIN FRANCIS NASON
ELLA WHEELER WILCOX

With portrait by Rockwood, New York.
LULAH RAGSDALE ...

With portrait by R. I. Howell, Brookhaven, Miss.
CLARENCE A. BUSKIRK.
CYNTHIA M. R. GORTON

With portrait by Devereaux, Fenton, Mich.
SARAH HELEN WHITMAN

With portrait from oil painting by C. G. Thompson.
LEWIS MORRIS
MARCELLA A. FITZGERALD
JOHN AUGUSTINE WILSTACH

With portrait by Phillips, Lafayette, Ind.
MARGHERITA ARLINA HAMM .

With portrait.
WILLIAM ALLINGHAM
SOPHRONIA YOUNG KINNE

With portrait by Ranger, Syracuse, N. Y.
KATHARINE LEE BATES
MARY C. F. HALL-WOOD ..

With portrait by Cook, Santa Barbara, Cal.
COVENTRY PATMORE.
GRACE HIBBARD

With portrait by Taber, San Francisco, Cal.
FRANCES FULLER VICTOR.

With portrait by Towne, Portland, Ore.
HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW
HEROINES OF THE POETS ..
SINGLE POEMS.
THE GRAVE OF FRANCIS SALTUS SALTUS
CURRENT POEMS
NOTES BY THE EDITOR
BIBLIOGRAPHY...
THE EDITOR'S TABLE

F. A. H. Eyles . 1. Arthur King J. L. Smith

285 288

291

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TERMS.-$2.00 a year in advance; 50 cents a number. Foreign, nine shillings. Booksellers and Postmasters receive subscrip tions. Subscribers may remit by post-office or express money orders, draft on New York, or registered letters. Money in letters is at sender's risk. Terms to clubs and canvassers on application. Magazines will be sent to subscribers until ordered discontinued. Back numbers exchanged, if in good condition, for corresponding bound volumes in half morocco, elegant, gilt, gilt top, for $1.00, subscribers paying charges both ways. Postage on bound volume, 35 cents. All numbers sent for binding should be marked with owner's name. We cannot bind or exchange copies the edges of which have been trimmed by machine. Address all communications to CHARLES WELLS MOULTON, Publisher,

Buffalo, N. Y Copyright, 1893, by Charles Wells Moulton. Entered at Buffalo Post-Office as Second-Class Mail Matter.

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THE MAGAZINE OF POETRY.

VOL. V.

No. 3.

GEORGE ELIOT.

WHAT

over

"Ro

THAT magic in a name; how vivid the

personalities it recalls; how they cling to our memory and lead us again through the scenes that endeared them to us. Through what rocky gorges and verdant fields we wander, down flowering paths with high thoughts for company, learning as we go charity for human failings and tender sympathy for human strivings. As a novelist George Eliot carved for herself an enduring place in the temple of fame. Powerful, intense, with strokes broad and plain, or touches fine and subtle, with groupings and colorings artistic and true to the life she depicted. One of the strongest intellectual forces of the age she looked upon that ancient wall of masculine mental superiority and it shriveled to a shadow. Whoso reads her work reads to self improvement. Didactic, stimulative, inspirational, it brings a clearer atmosphere and a broader horizon. As a poet we love her for her “Choir Invisible” and other gems of song, but though she had many gifts of a great poet her wings were too weighty to pierce the ærial clouds of poetic flight. Yet we feel that poesy glides onward with us through all her prose and lights even the dark of her own negation. Mary Ann Evans was born at Asbury Farm, Warwickshire, in 1819. Her father was a land agent. When about nine years of age she was sent to a boarding-school at Nuneaton, and in 1832 to a school in Coventry. In 1836 her mother died and she took charge of her father's house, removing with him to Coventry in 1841. At that time an intimacy with the family of Charles Bray resulted in a change in her religious views that, for a short time, caused an estrangement from her father. Her first work published in 1846 was a translation of Strauss's “Life of Jesus." In 1849 her father died. She then went abroad with the Brays and spent some months in Geneva in the home of M. d'Albert, an artist, who painted a portrait of her which is now in the library at Geneva, and afterwards published French translations of

several of her novels. Returning to England she accepted, in 1851, the position of assistant editor of the Westminster Review, of London. Here she made the acquaintance of Herbert Spencer and George Henry Lewes the editor of the Leader. In 1854 she entered into the connection with George Henry Lewes which she always regarded as marriage, but which the public did not sanction. Urged by Lewes she began her first novel, “ Amos Barton,” in 1856. “The Mill on the Floss,” “The Lifted Veil” and “Brother Jacob” followed in 1860; “Silas Marner," 1861. Adam Bede" was produced in 1862, and brought world-wide fame to the writer whose personality was still unknown

the pen-name, “George Eliot.” mola

was published in 1863; “Felix Holt" in 1866; “The Spanish Gypsy,” a poem, in 1868; "Agatha," a poem, in 1869; “Middlemarch" in 1872; “ The Legend of Jubal and Other Poems” in 1874; “Daniel Deronda” in 1876, and “Impressions of Theophrastus Such” in 1880. After the death of Mr. Lewes, in 1878, she was engaged for some time in preparing his writings for the press. In April, 1880, she was married to J. W. Cross, and died December 22nd of the same year. It is said she was a fascinating conversationalist, that the plainess of her features was glorified by the brilliancy of her mind, and that her listeners forgot time and surroundings and followed with absorbing interest the expression of her thought. She was tender and sympathetic, beloved by her intimate associates, a helpful companion, a true

She was a pianist of no small ability, playing the works of the great masters with rare interpretation and expression. Grateful friends mourned and an admiring public regretted her death.

C. R. SONG FROM "THE SPANISH GYPSY.”

woman.

The world is great: the birds all fly from me,
The stars are golden fruit upon a tree
All out of reach: my little sister went,

And I am lonely.

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