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delay and awful trials. These isles truly “waited for his law." And when it was published they submissively received it. Near 20,000 people have been brought under the instruction of na. tive teachers who have been taught by the missionaries. 12,000 are now able to read the word of God. Immense churches have been erected which are thronged with worshippers. The Spirit has been poured out upou various places, and above 2000 have erected the family altar. Nine chiefs of great influence have publicly professed the religion of Christ. Whole villages once given to drunkenness, theft and murder, have become sober and honest. The Sabbath is, generally, sacredly obser. ved. A written language has been formed, and a million and an half of pages of tracts have been printed and circulated among the inhabitants.

The Palestine mission has been deprived by death of two beloved missionaries, Parsons and Fisk; but no small degree of evangelical light has shone upon that part of benighted Asia. Wi four years nearly three millions and an half of pages of important religious matter have been issued from the press at Malta. 4,000 copies of the Bible have been distributed. Much religious conversation has been held. A few schools have been organized and no small preparation has been made for future extensive usefulness.

An exploring tour has been made under the patronage of the Board through South America, which has presented to public view the wants and miseries of that vast region, the progress of civil liberty, and much reason to hope that religious toleration will soon be every where enjoyed.

In 1816, the Board established a school at Cornwall, Ct. for the instruction of heathen youth who had found their way to the United States, that they might be christianized and sent back, a rich blessing to their countrymen. About 40 have there been collected together speaking the various languages of earth, and some have learned it is believed, the language of heaven. There, lived and died Henry Obookiah, a most interesting Sandwich Islander. It has answered the purposes for which it was established, but it has recently been relinquished be. cause the heathen youth can better be instructed in their own country at the missionary stations.

The American Board have now 46 stations, 43 ordained missionaries, 4 licensed preachers, 4 catechists, 172 missionary as. sistants, male and female. Also 36 native preachers and cate. chists, 600 native teachers of free schools, 30 churches with 523 native members, 32,919 pupils in the mission schools, of whom

CHAP. 24.

PROTESTANT MISSIONS.

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870 are in the boarding schools at the stations; and 7 printing presses at the stations, which have printed and put in circulation 20 millions of pages.

On the 20th of May, 1823, the PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL MisSIONARY SOCIETY IN THE UNITED STATES, was formed at Phila. delphia. Auxiliary Societies have been established and pre. parations made for active co-operation with other societies in bringing men to the knowledge of salvation.

As the people of God in America have looked abroad they have felt a new spirit arising in their breasts toward their own country. In May, 1826, THE AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY, was formed at New-York. It designs to concentrate the operations of all the domestic missionary societies in the United States.

Amid the benevolent efforts of Christians toward the Pagan nations, the children of Israel scattered among every nation have not been forgotten. Mr. Wolf, a converted Jew, has made the most laudable efforts in Europe and Asia, to search out and convert his brethren, and large societies have been formed in Great Britain and America which have sent among them missionaries and tracts, and instituted schools for their children.

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If this zeal for Missions which we have been contemplating, and which has, for the last thirty years especially, swelled the song of heaven, has constituted a new era in the church, no less has the powerful operation of a sister spirit which has carried forth the Bible to every nation.

In 1803, a Mr. Charles, minister in Wales, went to London to obtain if possible, some Welsh Bibles for the destitute poor in that country. His affecting representations and appeals excited numbers to unite, March 7, 1804, in the formation of that now magnificent institution.

THE BRITISH AND FOREIGN BIBLE SOCIETY.

The great object of this society from its commencement has been, the circulation of the Scriptures, without note or com. ment, in the principal living languages. Its early and unrivalled popularity, the vastness of its exertions and its blessed re, sults are and ever must be objects of wonder and lively gratitude. It has already issued from its depository in twenty-two years, above four millions of copies of the Scriptures, and assist. ed in disseminating or translating the Bible in one hundred and forty-seven different languages and dialects. Its expenditures have been above six millions of dollars.

While it has been thus active in supplying the spiritual wants of the vast family of man, it has excited Christians in different parts of the world to go and do likewise. Noble societies have been formed in Switzerland, Ireland, Russia, Prussia, Norway, Denmark, Sweden, North America, Holland, Germany, Parisalso in Asia and Africa, which, by their numerous auxiliaries, are rapidly filling the earth with the word of life. About 3,000 are now in active operation, whose annual receipts are about 500,000 dollars.

In this age of benevolence have also arisen the industrious TRACT SOCIETIES, which are fast filling the world with little heralds of salvation. The first was instituted in 1799 in Lon. don, which has issued from its depository 80 millions of tracts in forty-two different languages. The American Tract Society was formed at Boston, 1814. In 1825, it became auxiliary to the National Tract Society formed at New-York. These insti. tutions have also sent forth millions of publications for the spiritual instruction of mankind. In 1817, the Methodists, with a like commendable zeal, formed at New-York the Methodist Tract Society, which has been active in the cause.

In 1822, the Reformed Dutch Church, estabished under the

CHAP. 24.

SABBATH SCHOOLS.

419

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auspices of the General Synod, the R. D. C. Missionary Society, whose operations have been chiefly domestic. The Evangeli. cal, Lutheran, and German Reformed Churches, have each missions connected with their respective Synods.

To supply the great demand which exists for preachers of the Gospel, a society was formed in Boston, N. E. Aug. 29, 1815, called the AMERICAN EDUCATION SOCIETY, whose object is the education of pious young men for the Gospel ministry. This society has, during its existence, rendered itself eminently ser. viceable to the church, and promises, by its permanent funds, to continue to do so to the end of time. 660 beneficiaries have received assistance in the first twelve years.

Toward the close of the last century, the attention of the church was directed to her children and youth. Schools were established in Great Britain on the Lord's day, through the agency of Robert Raikes, for the instruction of the ignorant poor in divine things. The churches in America and other parts of the world saw their utility and followed the example. In Great Britain and Ireland 700,000 youth are now receiving instruction in 6,000 schools, from more than 50,000 teachers. In the United States, about 180,000. In the whole world more than a million.

The Seamen, who have in all ages, been deplorably destitute of religious instruction, have also of late received great atten. tion from the pious and benevolent. Places of worship have been prepared in some of the principal sea-ports in the Christian world ; preaching has been afforded, and some thousands have been converted to the Lord.

That the divine blessing may descend on all these efforts for the redemption of the world, a Concert for Prayer has been for some time very extensively observed, on the first Monday in every month tlıroughout the Christian world, and by Missiona. ries and converts to Christianity, in heathen lands. Concerts for prayer are also extensively held for particular objects ; as Sabbath Schools, Education Societies, Colleges, &c.

We have briefly contemplated the operations of the Protestant world for the enlargement of the Redeemer's kingdom. By these, the great Captain of Salvation is going forth conquering and to conquer.

How beautiful are his feet upon the moun. tains! The church is moving rapidly toward millenial glories. Forgetting in a measure, the contentions and sectarian animosities, which have, in past ages, engrossed her, she is with apos. tolic benevolence and zeal, carrying the light of life to "the old wastes, the desolations of many generations. Who is not

grateful that he lives in this age ? that he stands on this spot be. tween the living and the dead ? Who, in this moment of holy enterprize, of lofty exploit, will not pray, with greatest earnestness, Thy kingdom come? Who will not consecrate to Messi. ah’s triumphs over Pagan darkness and idolatry, Mahometan imposture, and Popish superstition, his time, his talents, his possessions, his influence ?

“ BEHOLD THE TABERNACLE OF GOD IS WITH MEN ; AND HE WILL DWELL WITH THEM ; AND THEY SHALL BE HIS PEOPLE ; AND GOD HIMSELF SHALL BE WITH THEM AND BE THEIR GOD. AND GOD SHALL WIPE AWAY ALL TEARS FROM THEIR EYES; AND THERE SHALL BE NO MORE DEATH, NEITHER SORROW NOR CRYING; NEITHER SHALL THERE BE ANY MORE PAIN; FOR THE FORMER THINGS ARE PASSED AWAY."

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