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ericksburg to state that a portion of Ewell's corps had been sent to South Carolina, and we have evidence to show that besides Cooke's brigade at Fredericksburg, another. brigade has arrived at Gordonsville to replace those sent south. Our men were within the rebel lines during the cavalry fight on Saturday. The troops in their vicinity were entirely stampeded, and the citizens began leaving their homes.

An extraordinary state of excitement is pervading all classes of Southern society in regard to the late retreat of General Lee. A lisagreement has sprung up between himself and the Confederate cabinet, and General Lee has tendered his resignation. He desires to retire to the line of the James River, and Mr. Davis urgently insists upon his defending the line of the Rappahannock. Much recrimination exists in regard to the immense loss occasioned by the advance into and retirement from Pennsylvania. All agree that the line of the Rapidan will only be defended for the purpose of retarding our movements.

The foregoing is not enlarged upon, being obtained from such sources as to make it entirely reliable, the details thereof being personally communicated to the commanding general.

It is needless to say that our men were afoot, and that the foregoing location of the enemy's troops was, on their arrival this evening, two days old. Prior to their return there were indications of the enemy's intention to retire beyond the Rapidan, fully confirmed this evening, and forwarded in a special memorandum for the information of the general. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. SHARPE, Colonel, and Deputy Provost-Marshal-General.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST CORPS, August 4, 1863.

(Received 6 p. m.) Major-General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff, Army of the Potomac:
An intercepted dispatch read by our signal officer is as follows:
General S. :
Orders to go just received; will do so at once. Enemy in same position.

C., Colonel.
A previously intercepted dispatch says:
Our left is left open by the withdrawal of Colonel Lomax.

Picket and artillery firing is now going on. Think enemy's movements will be developed soon. Will telegraph you. The enemy reported advancing.

JOHN NEWTON, Major-Genera?, Commanding.

HDQRS. THIRD BRIG., SECOND Div., TWELFTH A. C.,

Near Ellis' Ford, Va., August 4, 1863. Capt. THOMAS H. ELLIOTT, Asst. Adit. Gen. :

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report to the general commanding that I have this morning examined the line of our pickets along the river bank, which now connects with those of the Second Brigade of this division, forming a continuous line.

At Kemper's Ford, Colonel Ireland, One hundred and thirtyseventh New York Volunteers, has constructed a rifle-pit command ing the ford, and a large work, capable of containing his whole command, about 100 yards in rear.

About a dozen rebel cavalry have appeared to-day near Kemper's Ford, and Colonel Ireland has just reported to me that two regiments of rebel infantry have appeared about one-quarter of a mile above the ford. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. S. GREENE, Brigadier-General, Commanding Third Brigade.

HDQRS. FIRST BRIG., THIRD CAv. Div., August 4, 18
. .

(Received 11.45 a. m.) Capt. J. L. GREENE,

Assistant Adjutant-General : SIR: I have the honor to report all quiet along our picket line up to 1 o'clock last night. The occupation of Fredericksburg by the enemy's infantry and cavalry is fully confirmed. Captain Hamilton reported that he saw part of our Twelfth Corps crossing the Rappahannock at Kelly's Ford, and that the First and Third Corps, or parts of them, were already across the river at other points. If this be so, I do not think our pickets will-be-molested any more on the Rappahannock.

I think that in my hasty report of last night, I did not make it very clear as to what vedettes of Major Darlington were driven in. The attack was from the direction of Fredericksburg. The river at [or] near Fredericksburg is represented as fordable, and the enemy's force yesterday 6,000.

I shall do myself the honor to call at your headquarters this morning. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EDWARD B. SAWYER,

Commanding Brigade.

WASHINGTON,

August 4, 1863. Brigadier-General KING :

The major-general commanding desires that you send two parties of cavalry, of 60 or 70 men, to scout and beat up thoroughly the country in the vicinity of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, one party taking the north and the other the south side. The party going south should call upon Stiles, the guide in Alexandria, through Lieutenant-Colonel Wells, provost-marshal-general.

No mercy need be shown to bushwhackers. These guerrillas must be destroyed.

J. H. TAYLOR,

Chief of Staff.

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AUGUST 5, 1863—12.45 p. m. Officer Commanding Fifth Corps:

The major-general commanding directs that a division of the Fifth Corps take position to hold Beverly Ford, where a regiment of the First Corps is now stationed. This regiment will be relieved by the division of the Fifth Corps as soon as it takes position.

A. A. HUMPHREYS, Major-General, and Chief of Staff.

HDQRS. FIRST CAVALRY DIVISION, August 5, 1863.

(Received 9.30 p. m.) Colonel ALEXANDER,

Chief of Staff, Cavalry Corps: The enemy this morning at daylight attempted to advance his picket line, but failed. A few shots were exchanged. No harm done. All quiet now.

My horses are failing very fast. The grass is not good, and I have but little opportunity for grazing. Some of the dismounted men who went to Washington to be remounted have returned, and I learn that the officers and men are scattered all about the city.

JNO. BUFORD,

. Brigadier-General of Volunteers.

HDQRS. SECOND BRIGADE, FIRST CAVALRY DIVISION,

Camp near Kelly's Ford, August 5, 1863—3.30 p. m. Capt. T. C. BACON,

Assistant Adjutant-General, First Cavalry Division: I have the honor to state that the party I sent to Barnett's Ford have returned. They were unable to cross, as the Rappahannock was not fordable at that point. Mountain Run is not fordable, and I will be unable to get to the Culpeper road with a sufficient number of men until the water has fallen. The rebel pickets are on the opposite side as yet.

The river is quite high at this point. One narrow pontoon bridge has been laid down and a tête-de-pont erected in front of it on this side. The sally-port is blockaded, and I cannot get my supply wagons

General Slocum's troops are ordered not to allow us to pass ford or bridge without an order from him. The ford is almost impracticable for a loaded wagon. General Slocum's quarters are 14 miles from here, and if I were attacked and crowded, I could not get my train off. I have therefore ordered it to remain on the north side of the river, and the troops to cross and supply themselves.

On my left a reconnaissance has developed the enemy's pickets along the base of the hills beyond the road from Brandy Station to the Germanna road. I will feel to the front as soon as the water is fordable. Very respectfully, yours,

THOS. C. DEVIN, Colonel, Commanding Brigade.

across.

WASHINGTON, D. C.,

August 5, 1863—3.15 p. m. Major-General MEADE,

Warrenton, Va.:
What is the strength of General Gordon's division ?

H. W. HALLECK.

General-in-Chief.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

August 5, 1863—4.30 p. m.

(Received 5.10 p. m.) Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief: On the return for July 31, the report of General Gordon's division is as follows:

Aggregate. Present for duty...

3, 708 Present.

4, 149 Present and absent.

7,519 This is the First Division, Eleventh Corps, and is not altogether the same division that General Gordon brought to this army.

GEO. G. MEADE, Major-General, Commanding.

WASHINGTON, D. C.,

August 5, 1863—8.12 p. m. Major-General MEADE,

Warrenton, Va.: General Gordon's division will immediately come to Alexandria, where General Gordon will report by telegraph for further orders. All land transportation will be turned over to the quartermaster's department.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

AUGUST 5, 1863. Officer Commanding Eleventh Corps:

Pursuant to orders received from the General-in-Chief, General Gordon's division will immediately proceed to Alexandria by railroad. When arrived there, General Gordon will be directed to report to Major-General Halleck by telegraph. You will please telegraph to General Ingalls, chief quartermaster, the number of troops for which transportation is required. Also take such measures as will 'effectually prevent other troops not belonging to from accompanying General Gordon's command. The land transportation will be turned in to Captain Peirce, assistant quartermaster, at Warrenton Junction.

S. WILLIAMS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HDQRS. ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, August 5, 1863.

(Received 9 p. m.) Major-General HALLECK,

General-in-Chief: Your orders with reference to General Gordon's division received, and the necessary instructions for the movement given. The division will be furnished with railroad transportation from Warrenton Junction to Alexandria.

GEO. G.' MEADE,

Major-General.

WASHINGTON, D. C.,

August 5, 1863. Brigadier-General MEIGS,

Washington: GENERAL: General Gordon's division, of about 4,000 men, has been ordered from the Army of the Potomac to Alexandria, to embark on steamers for Morris Island, S. C. Please have transportation ready for them. They are ordered to turn over all their land transportation to the quartermaster's department of the Army of the Potomac. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

WASHINGTON, D. C.,

August 5, 1863–12.50 p. m. Major-General MEADE,

Army of the Potomac: While waiting for re-enforcements from drafted men, the time should be availed of to recruit your animals; to collect all forage and provisions you can in the country, and to clean out all guerrilla bands and hostile inhabitants in the country occupied by our troops. I hope to send you by to-morrow an order in regard to transportation, based on the orders of Generals Scott, Taylor, and Wool, in Mexico, and General Grant's recent operations in Mississippi. An examination of these reports and orders prove that the transportation of the Army of the Potomac can be still further reduced to advantage. I forgot to inform you that General Griffin's resignation had been withdrawn, and its acceptance canceled.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, August 5, 1863—2 p. m. Brig. Gen. H. H. LOCKWOOD,

Harper's Ferry, W. Va.:
Telegraph the number of your command of each arm.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

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