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THE

EDINBURGH REVIEW,

OR

CRITICAL JOURNAL:

FOR

APRIL ....JULY, 1830.

TO BE CONTINUED QUARTERLY.

JUDEX DAMNATUR CUM NOCENS ABSOLVITUR,

PUBLIUS SYRUS.

VOL. LI.

EDINBURGH:

PRINTED BY BALLANTYNE AND COMPANY,
FOR LONGMAN, REES, ORME, BROWN, AND GREEN, LONDON;

AND ADAM BLACK, EDINBURGH.

1830.

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THE

EDINBURGH REVIEW.

APRIL, 1830.

No. CI.

Art. I.-1. A Statement of some Important Facts, supported by Au

thentic Documents, relating to the Operation of Breaking the Ene. my's Line, as practised for the first time in the celebrated Battle of the 12th April, 1782. By Major-General Sir HOWARD Douglas, Bart., K.S.C., C.B., F.R.S. 8vo. London. 1829. 2. Additional Statement of Facts relative to the Breaking of the Line on the 12th of April, 1782. By Major-General Sir H. DOUGLAS. 8vo. London. 1830.

These publications refer to the celebrated maneuvre of break.

ing the enemy's line at sea, which was first put in practice in a deliberate and systematic manner, in Lord Rodney's great action of the 12th of April, 1782, and has since been repeated in all our remarkable sea-fights, with such uniform and brilliant success : And the question now at issue is, to whom the merit of suggesting that bold and decisive maneuvre truly belongs ? -to the gallant commander on that memorable day-to his captain, Sir Charles Douglas--or to our ingenious countryman, the late Mr Clerk of Eldin ?

Till very lately, we confess, we thought this controversy hack been over; and that the voice of the profession had at last aca corded with that of the public, in awarding the prize to the most learned and reflecting, if not the most experienced or immediately responsible, of the competitors. It was natural, and even laudable perhaps, that the pretensions of a landsman to this magoificent discovery in nautical war, should be viewed at first with some jealousy, and questioned with some rigour, by the gallant members of that profession upon whose province he might appear as an intruder; and there were certainly, for a time, indications of a desire on their part to do something less

FOL. LI. NO. CI.

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