The Fifteenth Amendment: An Account of Its Enactment. A Paper Read Before the Virginia State Bar Association, at Hot Springs, Virginia, on August 22d, 1903

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J.P. Bell Company, 1903 - African Americans - 60 pages
 

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Page 5 - I will say then that I am not, nor ever have been, in favor of bringing about in any way the social and political equality of the white and black races — that I am not, nor ever have been, in favor of making voters or jurors of negroes, nor of qualifying them to hold office, nor to intermarry with white people; and I will say in addition to this that there is a physical difference between the white and black races...
Page 10 - Now you are about to have a Convention which, among other things, will probably define the elective franchise, I barely suggest for your private consideration, whether some of the colored people may not be let in—as, for instance, the very intelligent, and especially those who have fought gallantly in our ranks.
Page 5 - I hold that, notwithstanding all this, there is no reason in the world why the negro is not entitled to all the natural rights enumerated in the Declaration of Independence— the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. I hold that he is as much entitled to these as the white man.
Page 5 - I have no purpose to introduce political and social equality between the white and the black races. There is a physical difference between the two which, in my judgment, will probably forever forbid their living together upon the footing of perfect equality...
Page 45 - tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church door ; but 'tis enough, 'twill serve : ask for me to-morrow, and you shall find me a grave man.
Page 42 - The guarantee by Congress of equal suffrage to all loyal men at the South was demanded by every consideration of public safety, of gratitude, and of justice, and must be maintained; while the question of suffrage in all the loyal States properly belongs to the people of those States.
Page 63 - ... old, almost, as the human race ; that the " New Woman " was born many thousands of years ago, and that her autotype, in some respects, is to be found to-day in Mangalore. A return to matriarchy at the present time would be distinctly, and emphatically, and essentially retrograde in every particular.
Page 57 - You need them also in Pennsylvania, do you not ? There are at least fifteen thousand in that great State waiting for your summons. Wherever you most need them, there they are ; and be assured they will all vote for those who stand by them in the assertion of equal...
Page 57 - ... Legislatures, and without provoking local strife so wearisome to the country. The States will not be turned into political caldrons, and the Democratic party will have no puddingstick with which to stir the bubbling mass. " I do not depart from the proprieties of this occasion when I show how completely the course I now propose harmonizes with the requirements of the political party to which I belong. Believing most sincerely that the Republican party, in its objects, is identical with country...
Page 5 - I have never said anything to the contrary, but I hold that, notwithstanding all this, there is no reason in the world, why the negro is not entitled to all the rights enumerated in the Declaration of Independence — the right of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

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