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A LETTER.

Copy of a Letter written by Dr. Robinson, the

Editor of Hesiod, to Egerton, Bishop of
Durham, with a large paper Copy of the
Hesiod.

cuses.

My Lord,

BEING prevented by the bad weather, and something else of more consequence to me, from paying my duty to your Lordship this

year, I beg leave to send an old friend to wait upon you in my stead, and to make my ex

He comes to you in a dress which, pero, haps, some will think too gaudy for a gentleman of his age and character; but I considered what fine company he was to keep, if he should have the honour to be admitted into your Lp's library, and was therefore desirous to have him dressed in the uniform. Yr. Lp. is not unacquainted with the real worth of the man, and for the sake of it will excuse whatever has been improperly added to him, by,

My Lord,
Your most dutiful

and
Obedient Servant

T. ROBINSON, Ponteland,

Oct. 8, 1756. VOL. II.

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THE CRUELL DEBTER.

AS fly leaves to an old book, of -1573, we find two complete, but not successive, leaves of an old play, entitled “The Cruell Debter.” The Interlocutors who there appear, are Ophiletis, Rigor, Basileus, Proniticus, Flateri, Simulatyon. The names of the speakers are in the outer margin, and the directions to the actors. The whole in black letter, except a line of Latin, which is printed in Italic. This fragment begins thus :

Ophiletis. It was tyme to haue in redynes all thynge

For yonder cometh Basileus my Lord &

Kynge.
Rygor. As far as we can let us stande asyde

Tyll he sendeth for you let us yonder abyde. Bas. I thanke you Proniticus for your dylygence,

Doubt you not, but your paynes we wyll re

compence. I am pleased wih. the accomptes that you haue

taken None of your bookes nor bylles shal be for

saken The moste part of my debtters haue honestly

payed And they that were pot redy I have gently dayed.

Pren.

Pron.

If it plese your grace we haue not finisht your

mind, Thear is one of your greatest debtters yet be

hind, We haue perused the parcelles in your bookes

set
And we find hym ten thousand talents in your

debt,
So we assigned hym before your grace to come
And to make a rekenyng for the whole sūme.
I wene it be that unthryfty fellow Opbiletis.
Yea truly, if it like your grace, the same it is,
I comaunded hym to be redy here in place,
That we myght brynge hym before your grace.
Wyth all .... tie I wolde haue hym sought,
And before myne owne presence to be bronght.
1 perceyue that he is euen here at hand, ,
I see that in a redynes yonder he doth stand.

Bas.
Pron.

Bas.

Pron.

It is very evident, from the specimen thus preserved, that the subject of this drama was the unjust debtor in our Saviour's Parable; who, being forgiven a large debt by his Lord, persecuted his fellow-servant for a small one.

The above is in the possession of the Rev. Henry White, of Lichfield.

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FRAGMENT OF A POEM

TO LORD WARWICK.

RUNNING TITLE

« A NUE YEARES GIFT."

TO MY LORDE OF

WARWICKE.

Page
1 To presēt Mars wi paper skrowlls

that sword and target lieks
And ioyes in clattringe coets of steel

and goodly armed pieks.

It wear as I should giue a reede

whear lawnce is clapt in rest : And warlike armour at the need,

defends the noble brest.

2
2 But whear theor is no weapons bright

that fit is for the field :
A man is foerst from barrain tree,

baer trifulls for to yeld.

Yet had I Cressus wealth at will,

my wants to turnish throw : I skarce could tel what gift wear meet,

for worthy Warwike now,

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This argues but my greate good will,

as farre as duetie goes :
Or may be cald for chaunge of spetch,

a foile that vertue shoes.

4 Of him whose patyer from the Nurs,

hath bin so noblie bent:
That with his life both staetly courte,

and country stands content.

And sayth that heer we haue to few,

or noen like him at all :
In sondry pointes of honour suer,

that we most noble call.

Then follows a chasm, of what length is uncertain.

5 If enuye barke at well wonne taem,

it calls mens acts to minde: And still reuieus the lamp with oyle,

that els would waest with wind.

If world but wist, what good doth ries,

throw enuies deepe disdaine : With bieting words it would not seeke,

mans credite to distaine.

Ff 3

6 Who

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