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The aisles of St. Pauls Church were then the fashionable City walk.

i

EPIG. 46.

POPERIES PRINCIPAL ABSURDITIES,

Of all the hoodwinkt trickes in Popery,
This is the lamentablest foppery,
When God is made to speake and to command
Men in a tongue they doe not understand,
And men commanded are to sing and pray
To such fond things as know not what they say;
And these men having madly, sadly prayd,
Themselves doe not know what themselves have said,

Note on the above.

“ In Papisticall Churches they both read the Scripture, and sing and pray to images, in Lattaine.”

One more specimen may suffice.

EPIG. 114.

TO MY HONEST BEN-FELLOW, THE PRIVATLY

CHIARITABLE DISCREETLY BENEFICIAL MASTER EDWARP PAYNE, MERCHANT OF BRISTOLL.

Piein is Greeke to drinke, Pain French for bread,
With Paine God says with these we shall be fed,
Yet without Payne many these needfulls gaine,
Only by thanking God and Master Payne,

JOHN

JOHN HEATH.

OF

THE following rare Tract will conclude my Selection of this kind :

Two CENTURIES EPIGRAMMES. Written by John Heath, Bachelour of Arts, and Fellow of New Colledge, in Oxford.

London. Printed by John Windet. 1610.”

These Epigrams are inscribed “To the Vertuous Gentleman, M. Thomas Bilson, sole Sonne to that Reverend Father, the now L. Bishop of Winchester.”

The following complimentary lines to the Author deserve preservation

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Casta placent ? castus liber iste. Jocosa : jocosus.

Innocua? invenies. Relligiosa? dabit.
Oh quot habes ipsis Musis et Apolline digna !

Oh quam multiplices, parve libelle, sales !

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EPIG. 2.

IN LIBRUM SUUM.

My booke it must please all, or some, or none,
And one of these three it needs must embrace,
It cannot possible please every one;
And for to please none thats a maine disgrace.
Yet for my will, what ere of it become,
I rather would, it should please none than some.

EPIG. 5.

It must be questioned in philosophy,
Whether the sight thats resiant in the eye,
Be first by sendi:g out these radiant streames,
Or els by taking in reflexed beames.
Might I, with my poore skill, resolve the doubt,
I should determine 'twere by sending out.
So nimbly doe we others faults discrie,
So blinde we are when we looke inwardly.

T. DECKER, T. DECKER.

THE Dramatic Works of this Author have been mentioned in their place. This Tract, the description of which follows, is curious in itself, and of such rarity as to merit a place here.

The reader will find some account of it in the Prolegomena to Steevens's edition of Shakspeare. That Critic has given as a specimen, the chapter which instructs a Gallant how to behave himself in a Playhouse.

The following is the Title:

" THE GULS HORNE-BOOKE,

Stultorum plena sunt omnia,
Al Savio mena parola Bastar.

By T. Decker.
Printed at London, for R. S. 1609.”

The reader will, I hope, be entertained with the following chapter, which instructs a Gallant " how to behave himselfe in an Ordinary.

CHAP. 5.

How a Yong Gallant should behave himselfe in

an Ordinary.

First having diligently enquired out an ordinary of the largest reckoning, whither most of

your

Which done, and brought him at another season,
Said now tis rime, before nor rime nor reason.

EPIG. 86.

The wicked reape what other men do sowe,
But cuckolds are excepted, that you know,

JOHN HEATH.

This Poet is not mentioned by Ritson, or any of our poetical Biographers, but he was the author, among other works, of the following:

“ Two CENTURIES OF EPIGRAMMES.

Written by John Heath, Bachelour of Arts, and Fellow, of New Colledge in Oxford, Quicquid agunt homines, votum, timor, ira, voluptas,

Gaudia, discursus; nostri farrago libelli est.

London. Printed by John Windet.

1610."

EPIG. 17.

I tooke the wall, one thrust me rudely by,
And told me the highway did open lie;
I thankt him that he did me so much grace,
To take the worse, leave me the better place;
For if by th' owners we esteeme of things,
The walks à subjects, but the ways the kings.

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