Page images
PDF
EPUB

QUODLIBETS.

THIS Collection of Epigrams is mentioned with respect by Warton, and deserves a place in this work, from its extreme rarity.

QUODLIBETS, LATELY COME OVER FROM New BRITANIOLA, OLD NEWFOUNDLAND.

Epigrams and other small Parcels, both morall and divine.

The first foure Books being the Authors owne: the rest translated out of that excellent Epigramnatist; Mr. John Owen, and other rare Authors.

With two Epistles of that excellently wittie Doctor Francis Rablais. Translated out of his French at large. All of them composed and done at Harbor-grace, in Britaniola, anciently called Newfoundland.

By R. H. sometimes Governor of the Plantation there.

London. Printed by Elizabeth All-de, for Roger Michell, dwelling in Pauls Church Yard, at the Signe of the Bulls Head. 1628."

They are dedicated to Charles I., whom the author terms “Father, Favourer and Furtherer of all his loyall Subjects right honourable and K 2

worthie

The swayne that saw her squint eide kind,
Heigh ho squint eide kinde,
His arms about her body twind,
And faire lasse, how faire yee? well.

The country Kit said well forsooth,
Heigh ho, well forsooth,
But that I haue a longing tooth,
A longing tooth that makes me crie:
Alas, said he, what garres thy griefe?
Heigh ho, what garres thy grife?
A wounde, quoth she, without reliefe;
I feare a maide that I shall die.

If that be all, the shepheard said,
Heigh ho, shepheard said,
He make thee wiue it, gentle maide,
And so secure thy maladie,
Hereon they kist with many an oath,
Heigh ho, with many an oath,
And fore god Pan did plight their troth,
And to the church they hied them fast.

[merged small][ocr errors][merged small]
[ocr errors][merged small]

part of

I HAVE by no means exhausted the subject of rare Poetical Tracts, which are to be found, either in the Museum, or in the Collections of my friends; but wishing to exhibit to the reader as various amusement as possible, I shall close this

my

work with a brief description of some rarer Epigrammatic productions of the earliest period.

1. “ THE LETTING OF IIUMORS BLOOD IN THE HEAD-VAINE, with a New Morisseo, daunced by Seven Satyres upon the bottom of Diogenes Tubbe.

Imprinted at London, by W. White. 1611"

This must have been a very popular work in its day, as there were several editions of it under various titles. The author was Samuel Rowlands.

The following specimen shows how much Tarlton was praised and followed for his performance of the Clown's part.

EPIG. $1.

When Tarlton clownd it in a pleasant vaine,
And with conceites did good opinions gaine
Upon the stage his merry humours shop,..
Clownes knew the Clowne by his great clownish slop:

But

The swayne that saw her squint eide kind,
Heigh ho squint eide kinde,
His arms about her body twind,
And faire lasse, how faire yee? well.

The country Kit said well forsooth,
Heigh ho, well forsooth,
But that I haue a longing tooth,
A longing tooth that makes me crie:
Alas, said he, what garres thy griefe ?
Heigh ho, what garres thy grife?
A wounde, quoth she, without reliefe;
I feare a maide that I shall die.

a .

If that be all, the shepheard said,
Heigh ho, shepheard said,
He make thee wiue it, gentle maide,
And so secure thy maladie,
Hereon they kist with many an oath,
Heigh ho, with many an oath,
And fore god Pan did plight their troth,
And to the church they hied them fast.

[merged small][ocr errors][merged small]
[ocr errors]

.

EPIGRAMMATISTS.

I HAVE by no means exhausted the subject of rare Poetical Tracts, which are to be found, either in the Museum, or in the Collections of my friends; but wishing to exhibit to the reader as various amusement as possible, I shall close this part of my work with a brief description of some rarer Epigranimatic productions of the earliest period.

1. " THE LETTING OF IIUMORS BLOOD IN THE HEAD-VAINE, with a New Morisseo, daunced by Seven Satyres upon the bottom of Diogenes Tubbe.

1 Imprinted at London, by W. White. 1611.”

This must have been a very popular work in its day, as there were several editions of it under various titles. The author was Samuel Rowlands.

The following specimen shows how much Tarlton was praised and followed for his performance of the Clown's part.

EPIG. Si.

When Tarlton clownd it in a pleasant vaine,
And with conceites did good opinions gaine
Upon the stage his merry humours shop,
Clownes knew the Clowne by his great clownish slop:

But

« PreviousContinue »