Anecdotes of Literature and Scarce Books, Volume 2

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F. C. & J. Rivington, 1807 - Bibliography

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Page 26 - Victorious men of earth, no more Proclaim how wide your empires are; Though you bind in every shore And your triumphs reach as far As night or day, Yet you, proud monarchs, must obey And mingle with forgotten ashes, when Death calls ye to the crowd of common men. Devouring Famine, Plague, and War, Each able to undo mankind, Death's servile emissaries are; Nor to these alone confined, He hath at will More quaint and subtle ways to kill; A smile or kiss, as he will use the art, Shall have the cunning...
Page 178 - WEEP not, my wanton, smile upon my knee, When thou art old there's grief enough for thee. Mother's wag, pretty boy, Father's sorrow, father's joy ; When thy father first did see Such a boy by him and me, He was glad, I was woe, Fortune changed made him so, When he left his pretty boy Last his sorrow, first his joy.
Page 5 - Beauty, strength, youth, are flowers but fading seen; Duty, faith, love* are roots, and ever green. His helmet now shall make a hive for bees; And lovers...
Page 173 - Greenes Vision : Written at the instant of his death. Conteyning a penitent passion for the folly of his Pen.
Page 330 - Yok'd with a slow-foot ox on fallow field, Can right areed how handsomely besets Dull spondees with the English dactylets. If Jove speak English in a thundring cloud, " Thwick thwack," and " riff raff," roars he out aloud. Fie on the forged mint that did create New coin of words never articulate.
Page 166 - Master of Artes : wherein, by himself is laid open his loose Life; with the Manner of his Death.
Page 123 - Even on the brink I hear him sing; If so I meditate alone, He will be partner of my moan; If so I mourn, he weeps with me, And where I am there will he be.
Page 285 - CHRIST, translated faithfully into English, out of the authentical Latin, according to the best corrected Copies of the same, diligently conferred with the Greeke and other editions in divers Languages.
Page 271 - Corruptions of divers late translations, and for cleering the Controversies in Religion of these daies; In the English College of Rhemes.
Page 90 - ... sweet Content ! where dost thou safely rest ? In heaven, with angels ? which the praises sing Of Him that made, and rules at His behest, The minds and hearts of every living thing. Ah, sweet Content ! where doth thine harbour hold ? Is it in churches, with Religious Men, Which please the gods with prayers manifold ; And in their studies meditate it then ? Whether thou dost in heaven, or earth appear ; Be where thou wilt ! Thou wilt not harbour here ! SONNET LXVI I. F CUPID keep his quiver in...

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