A collection of poems, by several hands [ed. by R. Dodsley]. [2 other copies of vols. 5,6].

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Page 267 - Gainst graver hours, that bring constraint To sweeten liberty: Some bold adventurers disdain The limits of their little reign And unknown regions dare descry: Still as they run they look behind, They hear a voice in every wind, And snatch a fearful joy.
Page 269 - That every labouring sinew strains, Those in the deeper vitals rage: Lo! Poverty, to fill the band, That numbs the soul with icy hand, And slow-consuming Age. To each his sufferings: all are men, Condemned alike to groan; The tender for another's pain, Th
Page 271 - To Contemplation's sober eye Such is the race of Man: And they that creep, and they that fly, Shall end where they began.
Page 43 - Seek to be good, but aim not to be great: A woman's noblest station is retreat; Her fairest virtues fly from public sight, Domestic worth, that shuns too strong a light.
Page 79 - Though meek, magnanimous; though witty, wise; Polite, as all her life in courts had been ; Yet good, as she the world had never seen ; The noble fire of an exalted mind, With gentle female tenderness combin'd.
Page 266 - A stranger yet to pain! I feel the gales that from ye blow A momentary bliss bestow, As waving fresh their gladsome wing My weary soul they seem to soothe, And, redolent of joy and youth, To breathe a second spring.
Page 76 - With pledges dear, and with a father's tender name. O best of wives ! O dearer far to me Than when thy virgin charms Were yielded to my arms, How can my soul endure the loss of thee?
Page 260 - For he, deep-judging sage, beheld With pain the triumphs of the field : And when the charioteer drew nigh, And, flush'd with hope, had caught his eye,
Page 73 - E'en for the kid or lamb that pour'd its life Beneath the bloody knife, Her gentle tears would fall, Tears from sweet virtue's source, benevolent to all.
Page 68 - In vain I look around O'er all the well-known ground, My Lucy's wonted footsteps to descry ; Where oft we us'd to walk, Where oft in tender talk We saw the summer Sun go down the sky...

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