The Wild Irish Girl: A National Tale

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J. Greenleaf; Oliver and Munroe, printers, 1808 - 310 pages

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Page 156 - Classical reading," says Dr. Smith, in his History of Kerry, " extends itself even to a fault amongst the lower and poorer kinds of this country ; many of whom, to the taking them off more useful work, have greater knowledge in this way than some of the better sort of other places.
Page 24 - ... traveller, all the pleasures of tasteful enjoyment, all the sublime emotions of a rapt imagination ; and if the glowing fancy of Claude 'Loraine would have dwelt enraptured on the paradisial charms of English landscape, the superior genius of TSal vator Rossa would have reposed its eagle wing amidst those scenes of mysterious sublimity, with which the wildly magnificent landscape of Ireland abounds.
Page 247 - Jind cm for bimitlf" meaning that his guests would fall under the table. In his second trip to Scotland, in the year 1745, being at Edinburgh, when Charley the Pretender was there, he was called into the great hall to play ; at first he was alone, afterwards four fiddlers joined ; the tune called for was, " The king shall enjoy his own again...
Page 64 - ... spreading to infinitude, seemed to the limited gaze of human vision to incorporate with the heaven, whose last glow it reflected — the rocks, which on every side rose to Alpine elevation, exhibiting, amidst the soft obscurity, forms savagely bold, or grotesquely wild; and those finely interesting ruins, which spread grandly desolate in the rear, and added a moral interest to the emotions excited by this view of nature in her most awful, most touching aspect.
Page 235 - I am convinced that were endeavours for their improvement more strictly promoted, and their respective duties obviously made clear, their true interests fully represented by reason and common sense, and their unhappy situations ameliorated by justice and humanity, they would be a people as happy, contented, and prosperous, in a political sense, as in a natural and a national one; they are brave, hospitable, liberal, and ingenious.
Page 56 - I left the shore and crossed the summit of a mountain that " battled o'er the deep," and which after an hour's ascension, I found sloped almost perpendicularly down to a bold and rocky coast, its base terminating in a peninsula, that advanced for near half a mile into the ocean. Towards the extreme western point of this peninsula, which was wildly romantic beyond all description, arose a vast and grotesque pile of rocks, which at once formed the scite and fortifications of the noblest mass of ruins...
Page 59 - He was dressed in his pontificals, and, with his eyes bent to earth, his hands spread upon his breast, he joined his coadjutors. What a contrast to this saintly being now struck my view; a form almost gigantic in stature, yet gently thrown forward by evident infirmity; limbs of Herculean mould, and a countenance rather furrowed by the inroads of vehement passions, than the deep trace of years...
Page 205 - Still melting there, and with voluptuous pain (O to forget her!) thrilling through my heart! Song, beauty, youth, love, virtue, joy ; this group Of bright ideas, flowers of paradise, As yet unforfeit ! in one blaze we bind, Kneel and present it to the skies, as all We guess of heaven: and these were all her own.
Page 226 - The waves of people at his word divide, Slow rolls the chariot through the following tide ; Even to the palace the sad pomp they wait; They weep, and place him on the bed of state. A melancholy choir ' attend around, With plaintive sighs, and music's solemn sound ; Alternately they sing, alternate flow The obedient tears, melodious in their woe.
Page 66 - ... upon the harp;' the half-drawn veil, that imperfectly discovered the countenance of a seraph; the moonlight that played round her fine form, and partially touched her drapery with its silver beam— her attitude! her air!— But how cold— how inanimate— how imperfect this description! Oh! could I but seize the touching features — could I but realize the vivid tints of this enchanting picture, as they then glowed on my fancy! You would still think the mimic copy fabulous; the 'celestial...

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