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Electricity

Rihand Dam Power

The dispute between the Government of Uttar Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh on the sharing of power from the Rihand and Matatila projects was settled at the Central Zonal Council meeting in Nainital on July 1. The U.P. Electricity Board will make available to the Madhya Pradesh Board 15 percent of the Rihand power and one-third of the power from the Matatila project at cost price, plus five percent. The price will be worked out by a committee after hearing the representa: tives of the two States, and will be reviewed once in ten years.

It was also agreed that a committee under the chairmanship of the Chairman of the Central Water and Power Commission will study the technical and economic aspects of the Madhya Pradesh's proposal to divert some water from the catchment area of Rihand to generate more electricity. All future hydro-electric ptojects on rivers constituting the boundary between the two States will be provided by the two State Governments in proportion to the benefits to be derived by them.

Uttar Pradesh is effectively cut in two by the River Ganges. To the north of the river, on the Sarda Canal, lies the Khatima Hydroelectric Project, which, together with the small stations forming the Ganga H. E. grid, supplies power for the northern and western parts of the State. Although abounding in mineral wealth the southern part of the territory was underdeveloped. To remedy this and industrialise the area a large source of cheap electric power had to be located. The solution to the problem was found in the construction of the Rihand dam and power station on the River Rihand, a tributary of the Ganges.

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The Rihand Dam, with power station and switchyard (on the opposite bank).

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CALCUTTA

11, EzRA STREET

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59/49, “CHOUBAY Co.”

Grams:

& Co. Phone : 37383

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Training of Tractor Technicians

Mechanisation of farming in India is the dire need of the day. The implications of mechanised farming are that all the farming operations in a field should be performed with the help of modern farm equipment which ordinarily mean use of an agricultural tractor along with other matching implements. This does not only involve the problem of supplying the farmers, right type of tractors and implements, but positively entails the suppliers of these machines with the responsibility of providing effective aftersale-service at the nearest point where such machines have to be in operation and at the same time equipping the farmers with rudimentary know-how about the operation and maintenance of the machines. To carry out this responsibility, the Ghaziabad Engineering Co., Private Ltd. conduct regular training courses at their Technical Training Centre

situated at Pasonda, on the seventh mile of G. T. Road.

The 5th training course which started on the 10th June, 1963 and ended on 12th July, 1963, was attended by 24 trainees, sponsored by the dealers of this organisation, who are responsible for servicing Soviet Tractors in their respective territories. Out of 24 candidates 20 completed the course successfully.

Speaking at the convocation, Mr. Y. E. Stogov, a Representative of the Trade Representation of the USSR in India said that it was a remarkable day for the students who had acquired sufficient knowledge about the working of Soviet Tractors. As such they carried on their shoulders a great responsibibility of utilising their technical know-how for the good of Indian Farmers.

S. Nirmal Singh (Second from right). Soviet Engineers U.N. Tarasov & G. I. Borisov (both in the centre) conducting a class.

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